Gentrification and the Poor in Los Angeles !

Major developments started at Downtown and as land became scarce developers started looking for more land into other communities throughout Los Angeles.  Not long ago the “Reef Development” was approved in which developers just sailed through the process with no major obstacles. Even when some activists argued that the this Reef development was going to displace at least 40,000 poor renters.  The Councilman and many other community-based organizations they all embraced said development.

Now, a new project called  Macarthur Park luxury development-“The Lake on Wilshire.”  has started its process.  This ambitious development is near McArthur Park and Westlake area and it will build “a 41-story, 478-unit, luxury apartment tower and a 220-room luxury hotel.” The development has gotten the blessing of the councilperson who represents that area.  It has also gotten the green light from prominent non-profit organizations located in this neighborhood.  Some of them have written letters of support on behalf of the development and attended the public hearing held at city hall.

This process on the surface appears to be open and inclusive in which community leaders truly engaged and scrutinized the benefits of such development.  Not so, community meetings were held just to project an illusion that a robust dialogue took place among different stakeholders. It was all merely a facade. It is a standard process in which the interest of developers usually tips the scale. Poor renters had no chance.

Advocates who truly represent renters in the McArthur and Westlake’s neighborhoods fear that the project above will in some way either directly or indirectly lead to evictions of poor renters.  These neighborhoods have a large percentage of renters, more than 80% living in these communities are renters. And the median income for a family of four is about $24,000. It truly is difficult to fathom as to how a non-profit organization in this area would support or even celebrate this development. These community organizations are conflicted and they are selling out the overall interest of these communities.  A leader with the basic ability to think critically could actually see no benefits from these developments going to the poor people whom they are supposed to represent.

Los Angeles being known as a bastion of social progressivism, one might think that poor renters would have been defended against the powerful economic interests that have been radically changing the physical landscape of the city. As developers tried to cash in the next project whether by building arenas, stadiums, theaters, museums, lofts or condominiums.  Poor renters in Los Angeles were being aggressively displaced and the so-called “liberal” or “progressive” politicians at city hall and many progressive organizations that included labor just looked the other way.

Los Angeles has really become a case study where social justice activists appeared to have turned against the very people who they supposed to protect.  Developers have a lot of resources and they effectively use them to influence politicians at city hall, community-based organizations, consultants and the poets and artists who constantly are looking for gigs to survive in this city.

Developers had it all figured out as to how they can successfully push for developments in Los Angeles.  Any developer who wants to build anything in LA, he or she will first have to see the councilperson who represents the area.  Usually, developers have developed a relationship with the councilmembers. It is rare a fundraising event that they don’t attend.  They also hire consultants who guide them with community groups.  Then, the councilperson makes the case to these developers that the development must have support from the community organizations in the community.  They hint the developers that they need to identify the community groups and that they need to use their resources to have these non-profit people on board. These are starving non-profit organizations that are constantly struggling for funding.  They are too conflicted that they care less if they have to sell-out the very people who they are supposed to help.

These non-profit organizations are the ones that ultimately make the case that a development is good for the overall interest of the community.  Some of these people who are behind these non-profits have no qualms in taking humble poor people to testify to city hall on behalf of these developments.   The house of labor is as guilty as these non-profit organizations, developers just raise the flag of jobs and offer unionized construction jobs and labor in LA just roll over. It has been difficult for activists who still look out for the best interest of the poor to disrupt this corrosive process in which developers dictate whatever they want.

In addition, many evil landlords also concoct well-coordinated schemes to evict renters.  So, a different class of individual with the ability to pay market rate’s rents could move into their units. Displacement of poor renters in many cities here in California and the nation might really be the civil right issue of our times.  It disproportionately affects poor Latinos and poor African Americans. It must be traumatizing for these poor renters being forced to leave a community where they had roots and where their children have been raised.

Los Angeles’ landscape has radically changed-there has been this kind of physical renaissance in the city, the Staples Center, the Disney Concert Hall, LA Live, the Broad Museum and all those luxurious lofts and condominiums have been built in the last two decades.  The promises made by civic leaders that these developments were going to increase civic participation, heal divisions along racial and ethnic lines and bridge the gap in wealth and income facing Angelenos never came to fruition.

Opinions are divided on whether gentrification is a sign of prosperity or a war on working class people.  It is not difficult to see that all these investments that have gentrified this city having had some sort of a positive impact on the overall quality of life of Angelenos. Many L.A. neighborhoods that were infected with crime in the 1990s have turned into more livable places.

Buildings, where the poor used to live in these neighborhoods, have been replaced by lofts, upscale newly built homes and condominiums surrounded by Starbucks, yoga studios, trendy restaurants, and bars.  Homeowners in these communities welcome the investments as they saw the fair market value of their homes skyrocketing.   Anyone who drives through Silverlake and Echo Park will see “well-heeled hipsters” as they are being called by those who are resentful as how their communities have been altered.
                               Picture above is Echo Park in a recent Saturday’s afternoon 

Our leaders in this city must internalize that the housing crisis must be a vital component of any policy decision or strategy that is taken on in this city.  One with a basic understanding of the needs, priorities, and resources of our city must have some sense that this housing crisis affects all communities in this city on all levels. For starters, this profound crisis affects the business community as employers struggle to find workers and people living in garages or in cars have adverse affects to public health safety.  Poor people unable to find housing they can afford in this city have moved to the dessert either in Palmdale or San Bernardino and have to commute every day to the city to work.  Think about that collective environmental and quality of life repercussions for LA of workers commuting for five hours daily.

Some activists have started pushing back with more militant direct actions.  And, they are targeting galleries and coffee places in Boyle Heights.  Some people including homeowners might not like these tactics being used by these activists. But they had forced a different conversation that might have included the needs of poor renters.

It is not clear how to measure success in this city.  Sucess shouldn’t be measured by the number of state of the art arenas, theaters, museums, luxurious lofts and condominiums, and stadiums being built or by the Dodgers making it to the world series. Sucess, one fair-justice-minded individual would think,  should be measured by how well our children are doing in school and how we treat the poor.

Thank you for reading.

Chamba Sanchez

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Sources used.
Khouri, Andrew.  “Southern California apartment rents will keep climbing, the report predicts.” Los Angeles Times 11 Oct. 2017. Web. 22 Oct. 2017.

Lee, Frances. “Why I’ve Started to Fear My Fellow Social Justice Activists.” www.yesmagazine.org 13 Oct. 2017. Web 20 Oct. 2017.

Novotny, Ben. “Persistent Gentrification in Long Beach Increases Student Homelessness and debt.” www..kcet.org 11 OCT. 2017. Web. 19 Oct. 2017.

Photo Credit:  Took pics on this piece with an iPhone.

77 Comments

  1. Rachel October 23, 2017 at 8:14 pm

    Reading this article made me realize that many people are not aware of things that happen with in their communities, and I say this because of me. Living in South Gate, many shopping centers have been built. This made me think that shopping centers are taking over home owners from their land. South Gate is a beautiful community, but now ever since many shopping centers have been built, I have seen more people on the streets and it’s really sad. So much money is being involved in stores we do not even need, instead the community should have more condos for low income families. Living in this world it is hard for a family to live in an apartment because it’s too much money and especially getting minimum wage. I think it’s nonsense that “ Some of these people who are behind these non-profits have no qualms in taking humble poor people to testify to city hall on behalf of these developments.” This is very true because many humble poor people do not even now what is happening they/ the community is not being informed with what goes on. It sucks having to lose a house or apartment, where many generations have lived in leaving many memories. Rent has gone up including food, clothing, bills like water and electricity etc. In my family’s case the water bill has increased so much and it is because there are like 12 people living in the house which goes back to the reason that the rent is too much and even then we need more money. Being a middle class family it is still hard having to catch up just with the house rent and even if we wanted to move out we still would not be able to afford it. I see family living in cars and garages because they lost their house just like my brother the house pay was just too much and now he lives in a garage with his wife and two little girls. It is very sad to see a family having everything to nothing, it is a big life changer that no one should go through. My sister is another example living in a decent apartment with her husband getting good money, had to leave because the owner wants to fix all the rooms which means that the rent is going up. It’s so frustrating to see many unnecessary things being built around our communities. Moving on, “This ambitious development is near McArthur Park and Westlake area and it will build “a 41-story, 478-unit, luxury apartment tower and a 220-room luxury hotel.” McArthur Park is a community of mostly Latinos. You see many people sealing a lot of things in the street why because it’s a necessity to live, to pay rent, food, children’s educations, and clothing etc. Half of these people do not make enough money, and having these new luxury apartment will just make it worse for the low class families. It is very frustrating and disappointing to see Los Angeles fall apart because of many unnecessary building.

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  2. Gustavo Dominguez October 23, 2017 at 9:18 pm

    There’s no doubt that many people in the Los Angeles area that are living in the street or in mobile homes parked on the side of the roads are the creation of the quickly changing lifestyle within the city due to the many luxurious projects that have been or are in the process of being built there. Renters are always the people that suffer the most when some big name developer wants to create something to only increase their wealth and not increase the well being or even moral of the low class or even middle class individuals living in the area. I have personally seen many people out in Downtown just walking in the night going to these fancy restaurants or big malls simply passing by, and some even going as far as to offending the poor with rude comments about their image, that are in the street simply begging for money. I agree with the fact that our success should not be determined by material objects and big fancy buildings in our cities. It should be determined by the amount of children that we see graduating from their schools and continuing their education, as well as seeing more and more people actually staying in their neighborhoods without having to fear the cruel fate of eviction because their rent is too high or because some developer wants to build a luxury apartment complex for those who are successful because the system works in their favor. If we want to truly get more citizens involved in the arguments made for issues like this where everyone can be affected, even those who benefit from a brand new stadium or apartment, then we should push those who are still in a good enough position to speak up for the poor who were forced onto the streets and we should push our councilmen/women to keep their word and represent us ALL and put ALL of our interests first and not what only benefits them at the time.

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  3. Andrew F. October 24, 2017 at 12:52 am

    This article brings light to those who are considered “Progressives”, specifically those who consider themselves progressives and believe that displacement of the poor is considered good. The reason why gentrification is such a controversial topic to those that it doesn’t effect is because, to those it doesn’t effect it is considered a revitalition of a neighborhood. Not how it is supposed to be looked at which is wealthy people moving into poor neighborhoods, to feel better about themselves for moving in and uplifting their community. The word gentrification itself is a word that was coined in the 1960’s, the word originates from the gentry. Which were noble and wealthy people who lived in the suburbs and commuted to the city for work. To be seen living in the city was a very poor social status, because you couldn’t afford the transportation. I dislike when wealthy people coin the term and still use there privelage to say that the poor are just afraid of change. This article makes me more and more upset, when I see wealthy people stating they’re moving into neighborhoods such as Boyle heights, Echo Park, Highland Park, and Even East Los Angeles.It makes me upset that people in the neighborhood dont care about their neighborhood because they dont have time to build it up. It makes me upset because it is that same structurist ideal that’s being fed to the poor, to make them feel adequate enough that wealthy people want to live with them. It is the upper-middle class couple that says they don’t want to spend money on buying big when they can spend almost a quarter of what their paying now in these areas to Remodel these 1950’s cabin styled homes, and slap these horizontal wooden fences on these homes and call it theirs. Even though their tax bracket can afford a 600,000 dollar homes. It’s the same people that want equality for all, but are oblivious to their privelage.

    On the other side it makes me want to move back into my neighborhood and make these changes as a former resident. It saddens me to see that change is happening and lower-class families are not doing anything to stop it. I feel like a hypocrite because I, too enjoy these ementaties, and feel that I am doing a disservice by moving in.

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  4. Merlin Sosa Olivares October 24, 2017 at 3:42 am

    It is indeed sad to see that poor people is being displaced out of their neighborhoods, but we must not only think about how sad it is, we must also see that this is our fault, and no one else’s. First, to take a stance and to say that this is everyone’s fault is hard to say, but it must be said. Many of us aren’t really involved into our communities’ issues. What happened to the displaced people? yeah, they may get evicted, but is someone actually doing something actively against it? not really. Why are the non-profits so desperate for resources? because although many people wants to help or donate to a cause they want to protect, no one is actively participating. It is easy to talk and write about an issue, but it is hard to commit ourselves to a cause. Many people can vote, but they choose not to. Passivity is our poison, slowly killing us, and our society as well. This issue -gentrification at MacArthur Park- is actually an example of the deadly passivity of the common citizen: non-profits, some citizens and important community leaders “support” this developments, yet little opposition is raising against gentrification, despite the fact that the most affected for this issue are the big majority -poor people, whom ironically, have the power in their numbers-. How are we supposed to fight for affordable housing from behind a keyboard? How are we going to make our voice be heard from behind a screen? Indeed, this comment by itself is an example of “internet activism”, but there is something I’d like to state before finishing this paragraph: if we don’t like something, stand up against it and actively participate. Commit yourselves to a cause you support. Volunteer, participate, engage and speak out. From behind a screen little can be achieved. Passivity must be extracted from our mindsets before we can actually achieve a change for the good.

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  5. Jrobinson October 24, 2017 at 5:41 am

    Your opinions seem to differ from one paragraph to the next. On one hand you say that gentrification kills culture and displaces the poor. On the other, you indicate that gentrification turns “many LA neighborhoods that were infected with high crime rates in the 1990s into livable places”. Do you mean to insinuate that economic growth and gentrification should only be welcome in select neighborhoods but not others? Do you also wish to imply that LA’s downtown area has not benefited from the economic growth in the past 5-10 years? Could it not be argued that the cultivation of fresh businesses such as the bars and posh restaurants, to which Native Angeles hold such disdain, have ushered in forced advancements in Los Angeles’ Infrastructure, from LA’s Mass Transit System to its police force? Or that the tax revenue generated from such businesses has made that possible? Indeed, a high-rise condominium adjacent to MacArthur Park would spark an economic upheaval, but it’s no secret that MacArthur park itself is historically associated with drugs and other forms of vice. My question is: why isn’t the argument aimed toward empowerment of the working class rather than economic stagnation in spite of it?

    I agree completely with the sentiment that a city’s success should be measured by how well children are doing in school. Civic pride most definitely should be attributed to the empowerment of its people and enrichment of its communities. To that note, cultural pride should be celebrated, not as a commodity, but a source of personal responsibility. As a WHITE person with heavy influences of both Filipino and Latino upbringings, I was lucky enough to have instilled in me, a certain amount of cultural adaptability. I’ve been blessed to learn much of what my own culture has failed to teach me with regards to personal obligation to community and, more importantly, to family. It’s that feeling of acceptance, which has defined me as a person, Mr. Sanchez, that makes this article hard for me to read. While I agree with your overarching statements, I will say that it’s biased to allude that poverty is racially exclusive. To insinuate that ONLY blacks and Latinos are affected by economic displacement only serves to stereo type blacks and Latinos into economic plight insinuating that they are incapable of prosperity. In addition, the dialogue with which you choose to convey your message, perpetuates an ‘Us-against-them’ mentality that makes whites unwelcome in Los Angeles communities. Furthermore, by vilifying whites, you’re excluding them from the conversation robbing them of vital opportunities for social and cultural understanding. The irony being that the momentum of your message is reduced to yet another piece of racially divisive propaganda which we are so accustomed to with the Trump administration. Your argument is valid, but this is an economic issue of class, not of race, and it needs to be more inclusive.

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  6. Jorge Fernandez October 24, 2017 at 6:06 am

    There are many points shared in Gentrification and the Poor in Los Angeles that I agree with, such as holding City of Los Angeles City Council accountable for neglecting low-income residents and catering to large developers. Our leaders are a driving force permitting developers that only cater to wealthier residents. However there are much larger economic and social changes that also exasperate gentrification. There is an enormous housing shortage in Los Angeles – so middle income households are moving into communities historically inhabited by low-income residents. Also, wages for most workers have not increased for most people working in low-skilled service jobs. Lastly, many people want to live in communities that provide culture and arts – wanting to experience life where they live and work – so, metro areas much more in demand than living in the suburban areas. With more people moving into cities, unfortunately people of color and low-income families will suffer. All in all, our leaders have created a process to develop our community with all its members in mind and have streamlined the approval for luxury developments.

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  7. Johana October 24, 2017 at 1:42 pm

    Houses are pretty pricey right now, the inventory is very low, and there is not much to sell. The people (some) who are living in mobile homes choose to live that particular lifestyle because they cannot afford a mortgage or rent. However, I have met many people living this lifestyle and they are as happy as calms. They live mortgage/rent free, can drive to any destination they desire, and without the stress that comes with purchasing/renting a home or an apartment. Some passersby view these people as “poor homeless” people and yes some are poor, but in my opinion, they are not homeless they have a roof over their heads, a bed, a kitchen, a bathroom, and a living area. As far as money goes, whatever they earn goes to groceries, toiletries, bills (if they have any), and what is left over could be used however they please. Regarding the low-income families being forced out of their homes, that is unfortunate and people who say they wish they could help, that is all they do, wish. They take no action, their words are empty. There is a somewhat new trend right now with housing, small 950 ft. tiny homes are being built all over the U.S. because one people no longer want to pay rent or mortgage and two people want to travel and live life to its fullest. These homes range from $40,000-$100,000 and it all depends on what amenities you choose to put in your home. Tiny home constructing homes are popping up all over, this could be a solution for low-income families not being able to afford homes in their cities.

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  8. Teo October 24, 2017 at 10:15 pm

    There are different opinions regarding what is benefitial for a community and what is not.
    It is true that councilmembers are supposed to speak for the people that elected him. But we come across a problem and it is that a politician can easily say that as a representative of the people that he/she thinks it is best for the community to allow developers to do their projects.
    It might be indeed better for the area, because there will be a stronger economy, more business and investments. But what happens with all the residents that had to be evicted or that will just not be able to afford living in the same area they used to?
    They will have to find somewhere else to go, there will simply be more homelessness, lots of suffering by the families.
    On the good side, the area touched by the developers will have residents of higher income and people with better education and more resources.
    As you say, success is hard to measure. To me it seems like our leaders measure success in dollars.

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  9. Marco Santana October 24, 2017 at 10:35 pm

    We have come to a point were we must weigh the outcome of developmet versus the needs of the community. It is evident that in recent times developers have learn to adpat to our ever changing enviorment and pretend to build for the community rather for themselves. As mentioned majority of the time these outlandish development ideas need to be aproved by the community and thats were developers tend to shine the most. They always tend to outweigh the needs of the community because they present liable reasons for the development, they tap at the core of the problem whether it be gang related problems in the community, the neglection of infrastructures in the community or other related problems. Communities tend to react in positive manner when powerful individuals adress these problems and jump onto the bandwagon to help move the project foward but what they dont know is that in the process they are also removing themselves from the picture. To clarify I am not against development in any community but when you are incorporating a codominium with a $2000 a month rent tag then it makes you wonder what is the purpose of this in a community like this. We must unify an fight agaisnt unnecessary developments such as those. Rather than moving ina direction of abondonemnent we must improve our communities and seek positive devlopments that will benefit our children in the future and their children. We must stop the ongoing corruption of local leaders and councilman/councilwoman and persuade them stop approving developemnts such as these no matter the pricing tag, we must be involved and turn up the pressure to prevent this from happening. We must remember that our political leaders are nothing with out our vote, so rather than shy away from the problem we must all embrace it as one and overcome the destruction of our neighborhoods and cities.

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  10. Merlyn October 24, 2017 at 11:00 pm

    Gentrification is replacing poor renters with wealthier ones. Even if the poor fights to stay; they would not be able to sustain the higher rent and eventually would have to move out. Of course, people that already have the opportunity to own houses around the area would want investors to build new shopping centers, coffee shops, condominiums, stadiums etc. They would be benefited greatly by it because their home’s value would go up. Imaging if lower-income residents are already struggling with their rent; it would be nearly impossible for them to own property. People can also say gentrification is a sign of economic growth. But is the economy growth equally shared by the people already there? That is a question we need to be asking ourselves.

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  11. Destinee T. October 24, 2017 at 11:44 pm

    Living in the heart of Los Angeles is pretty expensive because it is filled with many well-known historic buildings. It is one of the most cities that attracts tourists across the world. So of course these developers are going to keep flourishing this city with many more luxurious buildings to keep up with the image of Los Angeles. What I do not understand is how do they get the support from their community if it is filled with low-income renters. That does not make sense to me, because I am pretty sure the community will not approve of this due to the fact that their rent will either rise, or as mentioned in the article, they are going to be “pushed out.” This seems to me that the developers are making these expesnive buildings in a wrong way and neglecting their communities and how it can affect them. The poor people are the majority in Los Angeles and it does not make sense how these projects are being put into effect. This make me question on how our system really works. With all the taxes being used for housing, why are not they using it to benefit the low-income people instead of the wealthy that already have money to support themselves. I do agree as mentioned in the article that success should be measured as helping our state as a whole in the areas of poor, struggling citizens. If the numbers can be reduced to families being evicted, or just simply have a home to shelter themselves in LA, counts as a development; the development of a helping hand to its community.

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  12. Jamal Brinkley October 25, 2017 at 12:21 am

    With much gentrification going on in Los Angeles there is much more said about the topic than taken to action. Those affected (working/lower class) by gentrification have much to say about the situation but have no power in the final decisions. Most who are not affected by gentrification couldn’t care less about the poor being kicked out, and it is extremely terrible. What a beautiful sight to see that there are a whole lot expensive studios popping up everywhere, what a sad sight-seeing a family under a bridge, or waiting at the shelter cause they been kicked out their home. I think it is more beautiful seeing the whole community of L.A. from the lowest to upper class thriving. The quote at the end was the best part of the post “Success, one fair justice-minded individual would think, should be measure by how well our children are doing in school and how we treat the poor”. If this definition of success was really taking into consideration, clearly there would be a majority of poor people off the streets, and more children getting opportunity’s. I have not payed attention to gentrification before this class, and since understanding it better I notice a lot going down in my own town. I’m from Corona CA, and in the older part of town there was a big indoor swap meet, with a movie theater. Haircuts, clothes, jewelry, and much more all for affordable prices you couldn’t find know where else around. I used to go there a lot growing up, and so did many others. Recently the whole shopping center was torn down, and built up nice, expensive condominiums. Old town Corona always had a homeless population, but the middle class communities built more recently didn’t. After that reconstruction there has been a noticeable amount of homeless people living in the newer communities. It’s happening all over California and it’s going to keep going until more non lower class people provide proper support.

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  13. Jose Torres October 25, 2017 at 12:40 am

    Many people who live in Los Angeles welcome the changes, and approve of new commercial centers or hotels that are being established in the area. They don’t realize that these changes can eventually effect them. It’s the idea of “You don’t know, until you experience it.” I live in Boyle Heights, and I could see big corporations taking over my community. I noticed business’ owned by the community or residents, were being replaced with Nike store or Starbucks Coffee Shops. I became aware of this being an issue, and found it was stated as gentrification. Many Los Angeles residents don’t know what gentrification means or exist. Residents of Boyle Heights who own business, reinvest their income into the community, many people don’t realize this. Many business in Boyle Heights were family owned, and passed on from generations. Now these establishments are gone and have completely changed the community. Boyle Heights is recognized for the Mexican culture, this culture is slowly disappearing. The only way we can prevent this from happening is having more people engage in the activities of the community. As renters, we see this as temporary home, which is way huge corporations are getting there way.

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  14. Jocelyn Martinez October 25, 2017 at 1:28 am

    Gentrification has become a problem in our communities. More communities are getting gentrify and it is affecting poor people who rent. It’s really saddening to see these poor people getting kicked out of their place getting left nowhere to go, just so they can build condominiums or shopping centers. What’s more saddening and surprising is that non-profit organizations approve of these projects and don’t consider that it’s going to affect people. Yet, people don’t speak upon this being wrong we need to speak up and try to avoid these projects that will leave people homeless from happening. Rent in L.A. is already expensive to start of with and with it getting gentrify it just makes homes and renting more expensive and harder to afford for those low class people. Leading them to stay in their cars, streets, or mobile homes, even having to move out of L.A. Being in that situation it is really hard to find a place to afford to pay rent with the low wage income we receive. My family and I were about to move to Palmdale after getting kicked out of the home we lived, due to owner wanting to sell the home as the price rate went up, with rent being so expensive here in L.A. our only option seemed to be to move out to Palmdale and for my parents to commute everyday to L.A. because of their work. It’s hard to be in a situation like that which in most cases leaves people to be homeless.

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  15. Gevorg Mkrtchyan October 25, 2017 at 1:49 am

    There is no doubt that a huge change in the housing market is coming to Los Angeles and the change is mostly in the benefit of the city and these large property management corporations such as CIM, Redwood Urban, and Essex to name a few. The main problem that I see here is that these companies are building these luxurious condos that you can only lease and not own and this gives them the power and control to fluctuate the market and raise the prices as the market changes and pretty much force high class people to live in the area who have the $3,000 a month budget to pay rent. The positive in my opinion is that the city will have more money circulating in terms of property tax which will positively effect the economy, our public schools, and safety. Another positive is that it will benefit the small businesses that need that customer that is willing to spend money. The working people that want to do business and grow financially will be benefited by the higher paying market without a doubt. The negative effect is always the poor people not being able to get by and pay the rent that is rising rapidly. Do I think its fair? Of course not and its very unfortunate that these communities are forced to move out of their old place they grew up in. While I agree with most of the points of this article, I would like to point out that with these developments we are giving complete control to these corporations to control the community that lives in this historic city. Suddenly the benefits listed above becomes less valuable. I think this conversation is very important to spread the dangers of letting corporations control this city and I think the people need to put better effort in preventing this kind of control from taking over.

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  16. Pauline H. P. October 25, 2017 at 2:09 am

    These “wealth vs. the impoverished” disputes have been going on since the first settlements in Los Angeles. The land has been stolen from many, developed, and divided many times. People forget why Los Angeles is sought after, for the land and rich culture that California is abundant in. The sad thing is that gentrification had happened before and exiled the many ethnic groups that helped build Los Angeles, to the out-skirts like Boyle Heights, Inglewood, and South Los Angeles. Now, after years of confinement, the wealthy are claiming the barrios they forced minorities into. People use poverty and gang-crime to justify why these poor areas should be eradicated like a filthy dog, instead of asking how this came to be. In reality, the past tells all. These poor communities were created by the ethnic outcast who formed together out of self-defense. During racial riots in these poor communities, gangs formed as a result of social and racial inequality that was initiated by the rich and politicians, whom have always taken what they’ve wanted, when they wanted, just like now. Its not a surprise that Los Angeles is filled with poor, because it has always been policy to drive the unfortunates under bridges and into undeveloped urban areas. It seems that today’s “urban hipster” lifestyle requires an authentic scene that is the ghettos of Los Angeles. Authentic but doesn’t like the gritty realness of impoverished communities, so its easier to evict the filth but keep the artsy themes around. Truly disturbing, having been born in East Los Angeles, these gentrification cleansings are the wealth’s next attempt to force the poor out and these non-profits, for the people type groups are the their puppets once again proving that money rules all. It would be extremely hard to redirect the focus of developer’s fixation on Los Angeles when the demands of the higher social class need to be met. If the poor were really a priority, Los Angeles would have found and dedicated themselves to a lowered poverty percentile a long time ago. In the sad reality, it is easier to throw the eye-sore in the trash heap.

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  17. Jonathan Calderon October 25, 2017 at 2:27 am

    After reading this article, I see the repercussion of the lack of involvement in city government. People and even myself, are unaware of the things going on in their neighborhood. This is not the fault of the poor individuals that are too busy with their daily lives, but instead, the fault goes onto the greed of the individuals that represent those individuals. These council members are easily influenced by those large corporations with the promise of a better life and safer communities. While only part of this might be true, it only works in favor of the individuals who can afford the new price of these hotels, and not the ones who are being driven out of their homes because of the rise in rent. These communities might be safer, but it’s at the cost of others. Also, people themselves shouldn’t be easily influenced without doing their own research. This habit creates a chain reaction of intellectual laziness, in which people are relying on the word of others without proper knowledge of the outcome or cost of these decisions. This is a time where people need to start getting involved in city government, the lack of involvement has caused corruption in Los Angeles. The hope of change and progressiveness lies within the hands of the true liberals that are still fight for affordable housing in these neighborhoods. These people deserve out support and it’s our duty to make sure our voice is heard in these council meetings.

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  18. Jose Vicencio October 25, 2017 at 3:16 am

    I understand the struggles that poor people go through everyday, but at the end of the day ; as the saying goes, “business is business”. They are trying to find solutions to balance out the situation on helping out the poor and building new structures around L.A. but economically wise it is almost impossible. L.A. Is one of the most toured cities around the world so they are trying to make it more attractive. Now within the sports talk, the Los Angeles Rams and the Los Angeles Chargers have been donating and doing much for the community so it is like they are giving back to their community which is great and which is what they should do as professionals and as millionaires. as for other businesses, I don’t particularly see how they help our poor community out but but business is business. There is only so much people can do for the community and that’s the reality. As devastating as it is, the whole process is not run on emotions. There are constant new homes being build built in my community but they are so close the house next it, so we are completely crowded and it is a problem. I think it is safe to say that the majority of the people who are in charge of making crucial decisions like that are white and they don’t know what it is like to grow up poor so they don’t give as much effort to help out the people in poverty. So I think it is great for students coming out of our neighborhoods to be doing great in school and getting well careers and dedicate their time to give back as much as they can to their community folks.

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  19. Addley Walker October 25, 2017 at 3:28 am

    Good article, totally agree housing is one of the major problems of our time. Right now there is a big push to repeal Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, which put serious limits on rent control, pretty much freeing it from every single-family house and condo after ’95. This allows developers to, as is talked about in class, just push people up and put up all new junk for rich dorks. I think any benefit gentrification has is negligible due to it’s high cost of human misery. Also all these fancy places suck and are boring!!
    DEFEND BOYLE HEIGHTS!

    As much as I like to rabble rouse, I did not read the article as focusing disproportionately on POC struggle at the expense of poor whites. The phrasing in the article is “It disproportionately affects poor Latinos and poor African Americans” (chambasanchez.com) which is true.

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  20. William October 25, 2017 at 3:54 am

    This article describes the ways politicians, activists, and community organizations fall prey to the influence of money from developers. The purpose of this article is to inform readers on how developers push for development in Los Angeles by employing corrupt practices. This article was written to persuade readers to sympathize with poor renters.

    The author makes a few baseless claims that look like speculation without proper evidence. For example, the author claims that community meetings are a facade in the third paragraph. However, there is no evidence in the following sentences to support this claim, therefore the reader does not know if this claim is true. Another example can be seen in paragraph seven where the author claims that developers have a foolproof plan to push developments in Los Angeles. Again, these claims appear speculative without evidence. The reader does not know the truth to this claim without sufficient evidence.

    The author also uses loaded words to paint a picture of landlords in California. The ninth paragraph states that “many evil landlords also concoct well-coordinated schemes to evict renters”. The author compares landlords to monsters using diction such as “evil”, “concoct” and “schemes”. This is done to deceive readers into expressing outrage against landlords.

    Moreover, the author fails to include multiple perspectives to create a well-rounded argument. In the eleventh paragraph, the author states that there are different opinions surrounding the effects of gentrification. The author includes claims and evidence that support a positive view on gentrification, but fails to includes views from those who believe that gentrification is detrimental for the community.

    Finally, the author concludes the article with a red herring. The last paragraph offers the author’s view of how success should be measured. This paragraph is irrelevant to the author’s main idea as it does not contribute to the main idea that developers use money to pressure politicians and activists to allow for development projects in Los Angeles. This red herring serves as a distraction to the reader. If the reader wanted to further the argument made by the author, the reader might be misled by the red herring and discuss the measurability of success.

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  21. Adam Amaro October 25, 2017 at 4:04 am

    Housing has become an even bigger issue due to developers and the public interest. The merits tied to the development of the “Reef Development” and “The Lake on Wilshire” are entitled to the investors and developers. The poor or less fortunate are entitled to an eviction. Families that rent are in a crisis due to the selling out of their civic leaders. This teeter totter is in favor of the developers so if political leaders do not advocate a robust plan such as postponing the developments or payout the renters a lump sum for their rental property. Developers want to see income and renters need housing, there should be a compromise. The decision does not have to be one or the other because the developers are choosing to create establishments that only attract folks that have more than just a stable income. Housing programs such as Section 8 can be obtained over the course of 18 months, if you are on the wait list. This crisis needs to be deliberated to the microscopic point where there are no objections. No one no matter where you are from should never be kicked out of their place of tranquility.

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  22. Salvador Garcia October 25, 2017 at 4:22 am

    This is totally true. after reading this article it makes me think that Los Angeles won’t be the same if we let these things happen. first of all, where i live, there are like five or six buildings that are really old. however the rent is kind of reasonable but still is affordable. but, one block away there are these luxury apartments that start from $2,000 a month plus parking is around $250 a month as well. For me this indicates that Los Angeles is becoming more industrial. Also, it seems to me that everything is just business. i assume that these is happening because our people don’t do nothing about it. we just let things happen. if we would fight back and protest and join in our community politics non of these would have been happening. Furthermore, there more homeless living in the streets and other are struggling with their rent; and these jerks are making luxury apartments for the rich. AND WHAT ABOUT THE POOR PEOPLE! its like if were getting terminate.

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  23. Aurora Flores October 25, 2017 at 5:24 am

    Is really sad what’s happening in my community because living in Boyle heights made me realize that not a lot of people are lucky to have a home, due to all of this changes that rich people are making to my community. I have seen people living in the streets because they can’t afford the rent or because rent is getting too high. However, is really disappointing that the non profit organizations aren’t making the community aware of what’s going on, and this is causing people to become homeless. Nowadays everything is super expensive that is hard to find a affordable house or even to feed your family. So, I would totally like to get more informed about this so I can be aware of what’s going on in my community so it won’t take me by surprise and to aware other people of this situación that is affecting lots of families with low income.

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  24. Andrea October 25, 2017 at 5:50 am

    Los Angeles and it’s leaders have decided the development of the city is far more important then the cities natives. There is no way the city is able to make both the developers and the people happy. It is one or the other. Unfortunately the people think they do not have a choice because they are so unaware of the political process. It is sad that people are so blinded by money and are willing to do whatever it takes even if it means hurting thousands of people. These thousands of people are not going to realize how much the Reefer Development will effect them even if they are paid out. Money will run out and I can see Los Angeles being infested with homelessness even more then now. The LA government needs to realize we need more affordable housing.

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  25. Joshua torres October 25, 2017 at 5:55 am

    Reading this blog makes me sad for the hundreds of people who will be losing their homes, and makes angry at the people who are taking these low working class peoples homes away. It is sad to know that the people in there community actually agreed with the tearing down of the homes of these low working class people and for what just to make there community look and seem appealing. these hundreds of people should not be displaced and for the people who voted for the tearing of these low working class people to be teared down to make fancy hotel they should know they let their community down. they basically voted for people to be kicked out of their homes the only home they have probably ever known. Businesses who are tearing these peoples homes do not know how hard it is for these people to get by with a yearly income of 24,000 and since they are living in rent controlled housing they are paying a low payment monthly that they can afford with that salary and to take these peoples homes away with the yearly income of only 24,000 dollars a year is basically setting these people up to become homeless. The people in the community need to understand that this decision is a bad decision because instead of making their community look better they are making it look worse more families are going to be homeless and will have no choice to live in the streets and or in Mobil homes. Instead of making there community look appealing they are actually putting more people in the streets and when one is poor and struggling to survive and feed their families one will commit crimes just to feed their families and crimes happening in ones community is not moving forward if anything your taking one step forward and two steps back. these big companies need to understand that with them buying out all these peoples homes they are putting families in the streets and when a community is struggling with affordable housing they need to help those in need and not support the tearing of hundreds of peoples houses. if they really cared for their community they need to help the people in need not put them in the streets.

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  26. Roberto Flores October 25, 2017 at 6:01 am

    this article hits very hard, not only because it speaks about the changes going on in my community, but because i am witnessing some of these changes going on in Boyle heights everyday. this article is speaking about the gentrification going on in Los Angeles. the gentrification is only benefiting the people with a high incomes. this gentrification is hurting the people who have been living in these communities for generations, but the worst thing is that the same people who are being affected are the people supporting this movement. this gentrification is affecting these low income communities by displacing so many people, but it is rising the value of homeowners properties. with this movement they are making homes and stores where only high income people can afford to be, and this is bad, because with all this going on communities are losing their rich history. this gentrification isn’t completely a bad thing, but the negatives do out weigh the positives. these drastic changes are a bad thing, because these buildings are being made for people who can afford to pay 3,000 dollars a month for rent, and people who have an income where they can afford to support these businesses that charge outrages prices like 5 dollars for a 1 dollar soda. this is what these business men who are buying property are trying to do they are trying to charge some one who only makes 24,000 dollars a year 36,000 dollars a year on just rent. this is their way of basically kicking people out without the people knowing whats going on. in the end i believe this gentrification is a bad thing mostly, because this will help the rich get richer and the poor stay poor. this act of gentrification will cause a big misplacement of people and this will affect my community, because all these people have to go somewhere and they will come here, and personally i don’t want that, because my neighbor hood is already over packed with people and 40,000 more will only make the problem worst.

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  27. felix October 25, 2017 at 6:05 am

    Gentrification for it significate; the process of renovating and improving a house or district so that it conforms to middle-class taste. Even though this benefit many middle-class people it affects those from low-income class. For example, renters are the ones who always suffer for the new developments. Because low-income class made the minimum wage, they can’t effort this new well develop apartment. As result rent price goes up and renters end up becoming failures of society. However, many communities in Los Angeles had to be gentrification which many house owners believed that the city is growing as a better community. The economic interest that these people as city council members are only for personal benefit. Some of this council members believed that gentrification is a “prosperity of the city.” Most renter today are the minority who are about to lose their home. According to report from the U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development “Roughly 567,000 people living in Los Angeles are poor renters who can’t access the government assistance they qualify for and are in danger of falling into homelessness…” Now, who we blame for this future generations the government or the people.
    http://www.scpr.org/news/2017/08/09/74523/in-la-half-a-million-low-income-renters-at-risk-at/

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  28. ziare October 25, 2017 at 6:11 am

    A lot has changed in the communities in south central. The living comfort is not what it used to be things have changed enough to the point where its hard for people to survive.Even though they want to beautify south central its a lot happening that the prices are rapidly going up. Even though many of us are not taking time out to engage into our communities so we would not know what would be actually going on until something happens. Our leaders have no did much that looked out for the community. But what they insisted would be to build more buildings .It is very sad that most low-income have to be forced out even though they already going through hard times as it is. Instead of them constructing a lot of business they should build more houses that will cater to low-income/ homeless people. Because it is already hard taking care of family and only getting paid the minimum wage and pay for other things.

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  29. Ana V October 25, 2017 at 6:44 am

    Living in a populated city such as Los Angeles, as residents we usually do not understand gentrification, unless we see it happen in our neighborhood. I grew up in Echo Park , which is a community once heavily Latino populated community. Now there is a coffee shop on every corner serving brunch.These innovation developments are masked under greed and selfishness by anyone who benefits. I do agree moving forward is progressive, but when it heavily benefits one side , there is no progress there. Many families are being displaced, loosing basically everything they have, because many people see their home as a haven from the outside problems, and when you’re being kicked out, several people loose this. What I find interesting is non-profit organization taking advantage of helpless people for profit, which is driven by greed.

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  30. Rose Garcia October 25, 2017 at 8:06 am

    This blog post is a necessary reminder of the bigger picture that is at stake here. Affordable housing for low income families should definitely be a priority on the Councilman’s agenda because protecting the lives of the inhabitants of the city are the Councilman’s responsibilities. The well being of these low income families depends on the support that they receive from their own community and local government. The actions of the non profit organizations and Council members are a clear example of how easy it can be to be blinded by the shiny exterior of something brand new and different. The gentrification of Los Angeles is doing exactly that to the history and culture that hides beneath the shiny exteriors. There is a story behind every citizen living in the areas that are craving to be gentrified. Gentrifying a city is ultimately a way to drive out the current occupants. Obviously with the rent scaling higher and higher, the renters will not be able to continue renting in the area. This motion of driving people out is more apparent since 80% of the occupants of the communities are renters. Along with that, the culture would not be welcoming to the former renters in the gentrified cities. I appreciate the blog post pointing out the need of advocacy for the poor renters. This post is underlining the necessity of having affordable housing available to “poor renters.” Chamba Sanchez is completely correct in saying that our success rate should be measured by how well we treat the minorities and how much we value the success of out children’s work.

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  31. Ignacio Martinez October 26, 2017 at 12:18 am

    What resident of a city, does not want to see their city improve and prosper? I know I do. I am fascinated and thrilled when I see something new being built in my city. I like to venture out and explore my city. Check out different neighborhoods and see what they have to offer. If you drive around Los Angeles, especially downtown, echo park, silver lake area, you can clearly tell that the landscape has changed. I like to think that it has changed for the better. But if you think deep down, it has changed, but at what cost? Sure we have all these new museums to check out, new bars to have a drink at, new restaurants to dine out to, but it burdens me to think of all the residents whom occupied that space before. Residents who just barely made an earnest living with a modest wage. Now due to Gentrification, they are out of a home. There’s is no feasible way a resident of that area making $10-12 an hour, can potentially even afford a $2500 monthly rent for a loft. A loft that is now where their apartment building was. A building that once held multiple single, one bedroom apartments, now turned in to a a-few unit lofts. Gentrification is a major problem in our communities, it is fazing out the poor little by little. What can I do though? I, myself, do want my city to improve and prosper. But not at the cost of displacing anyone out their home unjustly.

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  32. Steve Quintanilla October 26, 2017 at 1:39 am

    The problem of poverty and homelessness is something that society would rather not address or see. Poor people cannot afford powerful attorneys or knowledgeable lobbyists to be their advocates and fight on their behalf. This means that poor people are left at the mercy of everyone else with a voice greater than their own and in this case the ones with the greatest voices of all are the wealthy property developers. In the battle for scarce real estate in an already completely developed city those with the least will lose the most and those with the most will continue get more. It is a vicious cycle and it will continue to propagate as long as those people we elect to supposedly represent us all in government continue to be beholden only to wealth and their own political aspirations. The quid pro quo system between wealth and politics that our current political structure operates under is not sustainable and is not conducive to foster a healthy society. When those at the bottom are not considered and treated as worthless obstacles how long until everyone but the super-rich get the same treatment.

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  33. Cristina Sosa October 26, 2017 at 2:14 am

    Your post has put a lot in perspective about living in Los Angeles. It reminded me of the Chavez Ravine tragedy story, a part of Los Angeles history that seems to be repeating itself in this day in age. It was on a social media account, that I was reminded of the injustice that happened before the Dodger stadium. I went to that account later in the day to finish reading their post but they took down their post oddly enough. Nonetheless, I have witnessed this development happening in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles. It always just seemed like there were new buildings being constructed and the skyline began to change its silhouette. I noticed more homeless people on the streets and sometimes couldn’t tell the difference between human feces or dog feces. I have been working in Downtown Los Angeles for over fifteen years, and let me just say that what you said about how developers push developments makes total sense. It’s who you know at the end of the day and if you know a councilperson, your pass the door and gives them an advantage and the ability to come up with deals and what not. And how you presented non-profit organizations has been an eye-opener to me. I’ve always wondered how nonprofits get by but I guess they are just like all money hungry corporations benefiting from the poor communities. The displacement of poor renters is sad and even having to make ends meet for rent living in general in Los Angeles is tiring and enough. I get it for homeowners, they want to feel safe and proud of their neighborhoods but I dont think its fair how the new developments seem to only benefit the rich. I support the activists standing up for what they see is fair, I think their resistance can attract like minded individuals and make some kind of change for the next generations to come. California is a beautiful state and I can’t imagine myself living in another part of the content but if things keep up the way they are, I am going to have to come up with a new game plan.

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  34. nicholas marquez October 26, 2017 at 3:47 am

    Gentrification is spreading throughout LA and its hard to really miss it. Knowing that this is what is causing al the lower class people to move/getting kicked out from their homes is unbelievable. These people have been living there for years, maybe even decades. Money does control politics and with that there is power. Using this type of power to displace hundreds of families to make condos and hotels and museums is wrong. Ok, some people would argue that gentrification is good and it can be, it does help clean up violence in communities but it also tears these communities apart. The culture is removed, the community is being driven away and it shouldn’t be that way because to some people these houses/apartments are all they have or can afford. LA is being reconstructed for the working class people and are driving away the “poor people” from somewhere they are so comfortable and familiar with just because they will not be able to afford it anymore. For example, Boyle Heights as we speak is being gentrified little by little and no one is noticing. Across the street from where I used to live and my grandma still currently lives in they tore down these old houses and built apartment complexes, I went to go check the pricing and for a 2 Bedroom 1 Bath they are charging close to 1,700. That is insane, people that lived there only got a two month notice to leave because that is when they will start rebuilding, they got nothing and were left with finding somewhere cheap that they could afford. I thought the city council were supposed to look out after everyone in LA even the poor people, yet all they’ve seemed to show is that money talks and if you have money and influence then you can get what you want. In a way we enabled gentrification, we being as a community have driven it mad. The crime in the streets and the violence and poor maintenance have been sort of a bat signal to these developers and in a way inviting them to clean it up and making it unrealistic to live in without a excessive amount of money. In some of your paragraphs you talk about how gentrification is bad and how its driving the poor people away but in others you talk about how its good because it cleans up the city. I think you should talk more about what is happening to these people that are getting kicked out, where are they going, how are the cooping, are they managing.

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  35. Emiliano Lopez October 26, 2017 at 4:51 am

    The Reef is located east of LA Trade Tech. It’s an amazing space full of creatives and collaborators. Its home to LA Mart, Maker City and Magic Box. Many aspiring artists from LA Trade Tech would love to be a part of such a collective.
    In the post, Chamba talks about displacement, gentrification and selling out. These are very powerful words, however, he leaves out the name of the Councilman who pushed the Reef project or the Councilman who is pushing the Lake on Wilshire project and the non-profits who “sold-out.
    The City Councilman behind The Reef project is Curren Price from the Ninth District and Gil Cedillo from the First District who is pushing for the Lake on Wilshire. Why? What’s in it for these men? I believe that there is a compensation that these men are getting. I’m not implying a monetary compensation, but the compensation of recognition from the wealthiest in our society. Their egos are inflated with the false words of the powerful, the small perks that our elected officials enjoy while the proletariat fight for scraps on the bottom.
    I don’t place blame on our elected officials. The people got the representation they chose. I don’t blame the wealthy; they have the power to influence using their capital. I blame those who know of the injustice and turn a blind eye, I blame those who fear losing their jobs for blowing the whistle on corruption. I blame those who have reached a complacent point in their lives and can sit back and watch our city take advantage of the weak. There is a quote I love. It rings true today just the same as when it was uttered. “Give them bread and give them circus and they will never revolt.” Roman Poet Juvenal. What is your circus? Netflix, HBO, or TMZ what robs your attention from the real issues.
    We need these developments to happen, people need to feel this pain of removal from their communities, their culture ripped from them. Maybe we will wake up. The rich are encroaching slowly but surely. Downtown Los Angeles, The Arts District, Silver Lake, Echo Park, Inglewood, Culver City and now Mac Arthur Park Westlake will be devoured by gentrifiers. Before you rush to judgment, ask yourself, are you part of the gentrifying force? Or are you taking a stance? Even if you don’t take action. No action is still an action.
    We must be students of history. Think of the Mexico’s revolt against the Spanish Crown, The English against the Crown of England, and recently a humble Tunisian fruit seller named Muhammad Buauzizi set himself on fire in protest, it’s a fire that spread throughout North Africa, toppling regimes that have been in power for decades.
    To end, the only people that are getting displaced are those who know and accept that they will be over run and will not lift a finger. We need to us our collective energy to fight for our communities. We need to encourage our kids to get involved. Because “I would rather die standing, than live on my knees”. Zapata.

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  36. Giobanny Alvarez October 26, 2017 at 6:04 am

    The definition of it gentrification is the process of renovating and improving a house or district so that it conforms to middle- class taste, or the process of making a person or activity more refined or polite. After reading this article, I’ve gotten a sense on how gentrification affects or communities and how it affects the poor. People are not aware of the situation they do not see the dangers and impact, it has on people, for example gentrification is a new wave of colonialism and affects the communities with economic and societal, which can lead to public health repercussion in the community, It’s very disappointing to see families of lesser wealth being displaced and getting forced to move out of their neighborhood. Even if their some families stay with in the area , lets say a group of wealthier people move in ? because of gentrification landlords within the area well probably raise their rents because of the new people. This article makes you wonder and makes you think on how this process works. Some families might even become homeless because they wont be able to afford these new prices, which leads to a loss of social diversity occurs; from the socially disparate to rich ghettos.

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  37. Marcela Huerta October 26, 2017 at 6:05 am

    Reading this makes me feel like nothing is secure at this point. The apartments where I live were supposedly remodeled and are being rented for a ridiculous price. My mom has lived there for years and now I will be taking over, but I will be paying less than what others pay because my mom’s lived there for so long. My fear is that the property is currently on sale so if bought, anything can happen. The new owner will most likely increase the rent or maybe want to demolish the property and make another shopping center or something. I’m finally feeling some kind of stability, and I’m in a comfort zone where I am maturing and trying to not become un other uneducated young mother in other words another number to a statistic. As a single mother trying to succeed like many others; and having to digest this is overwhelming. I would feel a sense of pride when I drive around my community and see more tourists and nicer buildings. Of course, I wasn’t aware of what was behind all these sudden changes. But my concern is how long will the set of apartments I live in last. It’s all nice and pretty and our apartments make it look ugly. It’s only a matter of time for USC to continue to expand and knock over my community. It’s slowly been moving towards my side of town and now housing students by where I live and eventually they are going to get rid of whatever doesn’t fit into whatever developers’ consider beautiful or in their plans. I’ve always said money makes the world go round, but to literally kick people out of their house without even considering their circumstances over a project is just inhuman. This really makes me think of my personal circumstances and in hopes of these apartments not being sold.

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  38. Jose S. October 26, 2017 at 6:20 am

    Although I agree that it is downright infuriating that nonprofit and community organizations are selling out low income families, there seems to be no solution presented for the problems aforementioned. It seems that you even backtrack on your arguments by saying “…L.A. neighborhoods that were infected with crime in the 1990s have turned into more livable places.” Where is the rebuttal? Where is the call to action that we so desperately need in order to combat these vicious developers? They are using that exact same argument, that you only presented for a split second, in order to justify their development plans. It is no secret that these developers are actually making neighborhoods safe and cleaning out desolate areas. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for all my life and can tell you that in my childhood Echo and Macarthur Park were so infamously bad that I would never dare travel there. Now I hear my friends saying all the time that they love to hang out at said parks. When they first cleaned Echo Park multiple weapons and drug substances were found. Now I’m not agreeing with the developers but it is hard to argue against such positive changes. It just seems to me that those involved will continue to make money thus never finding a solution for those low-income families. Of course, my heart goes out to any family struggling as I was once there too (ultimately sharing a house when I was child) but how do we fight against such a corrupted establishment. And on a side note, to use the label of “hipsters” seems a little below you. Although some know what’s going on (bastards) most are just trying to find a relatively nice place to live. Instead of out casting or grouping all these people that live in these new condos let’s open their minds so it does not happen again. Although, as I said, that still might not be enough to spark any real change against such money-fueled developers. I would however, like to see what your plan would be.

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  39. Jerrsha Banks October 26, 2017 at 6:42 am

    My understanding from reading this article gentrification is suppose to be a good thing in our communities. However, people find it to be a problem because people living situation are in jeopardy. With my first time reading about this topic, I do have mixed feelings about it. I feel when it comes to the word “gentrification” has a lot to do with developers buying or reconstructed houses low income families currently living in to only cater to the wealthy individuals. This is putting low income families in a terrible situation because they are either forced out, homeless or relocate to a area they didn’t want to live in the first place. This shouldn’t be happening. Though people may argue that if you can afford to buy a house in the city, you have a right too but does that make it right? I understand that in low income cities, it’s easy to find buildings who needs better assistance. But the less privileged shouldn’t suffer because money is the issue. Therefore we need to start doing what’s best for the people. People should start investing in not a better home for themselves, but a better world where every individual could benefit from it. That this should not be limited only to the privileged but everyone hardworking individual who’s making a difference in this world.

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  40. Susan Cisneros October 26, 2017 at 6:57 am

    Some of us wonder, if gentrification is so bad. Why is it happening? People can argue that some communities need that burst of income, it will better the area. The neighborhood won’t look so torn down, and crime might diminish. These new developments are good for the communities, according to the investors and those backing them up with these new projects. Since they are providing new jobs it makes these projects okay. Others can argue that while the neighborhood is” getting better”, there are those that can’t be part of that better community. Since they are part of a low income bracket, those apartments are not at the capability of the regular low to middle class Joes out there. So is the case with the MacArthur park luxury developers. That area is mostly low income and they will be displace. Aside from the obvious, which is corruption within our government, which sell out to these investors. The investors get away with the argument that, these new projects will help the community. Which in reality it doesn’t. The reality is that those who can afford these new apartments are not minimum wage earning people, and the only ones benefiting with these new projects are the investor. Unfortunately that happens when there’s a community that can’t defend for themselves, because those that represent them sell out.

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    1. sharon garcia October 26, 2017 at 5:22 pm

      As a resident of the city of Los Angeles, I feel that we do deserve to have modern, up to date upgrades to the city. I also believe that we can achieve these cosmetic upgrades and also help those who need it the most for example, homeless people. I believe that along with a new Starbucks or a new CVS someone can also build for the lower incomes in the city. We are currently in the second largest city of this country, so i know it can be possible. It is going to take a whole uprising of a city to let our voices be heard. It is beyond my comprehension how we can allow men, women and children sleep in vans or cars and have empty un-rentable units in the middle of down. It doesn’t make any kind of sense. Other areas out side of downtown, for instance south central, is also gaining interest from developers. Many of the homeowners who stayed in south LA after the riots helped this area become normal again. Now they are thinking that selling their property will benefit their pocket, but fail to realize that once the home is sold it will for ever change the lay out of our city streets. Because that corner meat market will soon be converted into a pet grooming business, something that our community can do with out. Sure gentrification can provide a more polished look, but that is all it is, a look. It does not provide for the people who make 22,000 (or under) dollars a year. It is not working for the folks who are on government assistance. The pet groomers wont take EBT. Until some one with the money and the connections takes interest in the poor nothing will change for us. I believe we should demand safe and affordable, reasonable priced housing for the people of the city. Los Angeles serves the wealthy with a silver spoon, and its about time they also feed the poor, because we are hungry.

      Reply
  41. Evelyn November 10, 2017 at 3:20 am

    “Gentrification and the Poor.”

    I strongly feel that investment should always be welcomed in our communities. However, I strongly disagree with the approach city council representatives and developers are taking towards the tenants that live under rent-control pricing. It disgusts me to see how some of these ambitious landlords just want to monopolize from these individuals, making it impossible for individuals to live in decent conditions. But of course, it makes much sense that they would do that to only maximize their profit by selling their property more than double the original price. The problem itself, is not only the housing crisis: the problem is the lack of opportunities within these low-income communities. Many of these tenants are “socioeconomically disadvantaged” and pushing them out of their homes will not solve the problem, it will only increase the levels of homelessness in Los Angeles. These communities need investments that will empower them to become more skilled and improve their standard quality of living. We must civically engage with our community leaders and demand more from them. Displacing them should not be an option. What these individuals need is a form of “affordable housing” and more employment opportunities. Let’s have a sense of urgency and really focus on the things that empower our communities, education to begin with! Why not invest in the youth from our communities? We should offer them the resources to obtain a higher education through recreational centers that gives them guidance and teaches them self-discipline. It’s time that individuals really open their eyes, and hold their leaders accountable for their mischiefs in the practice of politics.

    Reply
  42. Yvette Gomez November 14, 2017 at 2:20 am

    Homelessness should be the topic on everyone’s mind but of course many will overlook a problem that is not theirs but will try to take advantage of the situation by seeing how they can make it about themselves, and profit from it. As USC continues to throw money to itself, expanding north and south on Figueroa, Metro also expands across the Crenshaw District into Inglewood where the Los Angeles Rams have returned to town and have already begun building their new stadium in Inglewood, the greater South Central Los Angeles area is facing new issues that further complicate the ones that have long overdue existed. Different organizations in the area are working hard to stop gentrification and displacement but I think it really comes down to, it being inevitable for people of color or communities to never have a choice in where they choose to live? As housing prices rise, people of color who cherish their community and culture are fighting against unsustainable rents and forces their neighbors into homelessness. It is absolutely heartbreaking to witness this firsthand and not being able to do anything about it? What are some suggestions we can give people of the community to resist this “inevitable” gentrification developments that are swallowing neighborhoods whole?

    Reply
  43. Lessly Ramirez January 15, 2018 at 6:55 pm

    This article makes a lot of good points, not only, because it speaks about the changes going on in my community, but because I have seen many residents struggling just to raise enough money to pay their rent, besides the fact that they have other expenses to cover and a family to provide for. This article is speaking about the gentrification going on in Los Angeles, only benefiting the people with a high incomes, meaning they get paid more than the minimum wage. The process of gentrification is hurting the residents who have been living in these communities for years, but the worst thing is that the same people who are being affected are the people supporting this movement, they are being blindsided by all these promises made by the politicians involved. Gentrification is affecting these low income communities by displacing so many people, but it is rising the value of homeowner’s properties. With this movement they are making homes and stores where only high income people can afford to be, and this is bad, because with all this going on communities are losing their rich history. Gentrification isn’t completely a bad thing, a modern update isn’t the worst thing in the world, but the negatives do outweigh the positives. These drastic changes are a bad thing, because these buildings are being made for people who can afford to pay 3,000 dollars a month for rent, and people who have an income where they can afford to support these businesses that charge outrages prices like $5 for a $1 soda. Like come on this isn’t an amusement park. This is what these business men who are buying property are trying to do they are trying to charge someone who only makes over $20,000 a year to $36,000 a year on just rent. This process of gentrification is their way of basically kicking poor renting-people out without the people knowing what’s going on. In the end I believe this gentrification is a bad thing mostly, because this will help the rich get richer and the poor stay poor. The act of gentrification will cause a big misplacement of people and this will affect my community, because all these people have to go somewhere and they will come here, and personally I don’t want that and I know there are many of us who do not want that either, because my there are many neighborhoods being taken over and soon they will have nowhere to go. I, personally, strongly feel that investment should always be welcomed in our communities, as long as we know where the money is going into. However, I strongly disagree with the approach city council representatives and developers are taking towards the tenants that live under rent-control pricing, leaving them out in the street, with them knowing they have families to support. Looking up the word gentrification it states its definition as, “The process of renovating and improving a house or district so that it conforms to middle-class taste.” The key words are ‘middle-class’. As I can see these powerful politicians only want to help the middle-class and up, so what happens to the lower-income class? Next thing we know our local streets are full with new homeless residents, and that is an instigating issue. If these politicians really want to see a great change in this city they must first understand that everyone must be involved, meaning creating a strategy or plan that benefits everyone in the area. Everyone knows it is hard to compromise, but it is not impossible.

    Reply
  44. Lessly Ramirez January 15, 2018 at 7:04 pm

    This article, “Gentrification and the Poor in Los Angeles” makes a lot of good points, not only, because it speaks about the changes going on in my community, but because I have seen many residents struggling just to raise enough money to pay their rent, besides the fact that they have other expenses to cover and a family to provide for. This article is speaking about the gentrification going on in Los Angeles, only benefiting the people with a high incomes, meaning they get paid more than the minimum wage. The residents re being blindsided by all these promises made by the politicians involved. Gentrification is affecting these low income communities by displacing so many people, but it is rising the value of the new structures. With this movement they are making homes and stores where only high income people can afford to be, and this is bad, because with all this going on communities are losing their rich history. Gentrification isn’t completely a bad thing, a modern update isn’t the worst thing in the world, but the negatives do outweigh the positives. These drastic changes are a bad thing, because these buildings are being made for people who can afford to pay more than a $1,000 month for rent, and people who have an income where they can afford to support these businesses. This process of gentrification is their way of basically kicking poor renting-people out without the people knowing what’s going on. Gentrification is a bad thing mostly, because this will help the rich get richer and the poor stay poor or worse have no income. The act of gentrification will cause a big misplacement of people and this will affect many of out communities, because all these people have to go somewhere and they will travel throughout this huge county to find a small apartment or house at an even higher price, personally I don’t want that and I know there are many of us who do not want that either, because my there are many neighborhoods being taken over and soon they will have nowhere to go. I, personally, strongly feel that investment should always be welcomed in our communities, as long as we know where the money is going into. However, I strongly disagree with the approach city council representatives and developers are taking towards the tenants that live under rent-control pricing, leaving them out in the street, with them knowing they have families to support. Looking up the word gentrification it states its definition as, “The process of renovating and improving a house or district so that it conforms to middle-class taste.” The key words are ‘middle-class’. As I can see these powerful politicians only want to help the middle-class and up, so what happens to the lower-income class? Next thing we know our local streets are full with new homeless residents, and that is an instigating issue. If these politicians really want to see a great change in this city they must first understand that everyone must be involved, meaning creating a strategy or plan that benefits everyone in the area. Everyone knows it is hard to compromise, but it is not impossible.

    Reply
  45. Maria Flores January 15, 2018 at 9:11 pm

    It would be easier for me to write this comment in Spanish. But since my English is not perfect, I will try my best to describe what I think about this article.
    I find it interesting. We talk about this topic all the time mostly with my mother at my parents house. She has been living in the area of Eagle Rock for already ten or eleven years. And myself used to live in the area of Highland Park around ten years ago. Both areas of the city of Los Angeles, have been part of this actual “gentrification” in the last recent years around the whole county. This developments not only affect the housing problem. They also affect the people income on many different ways. More affordable and low price grocery and retail stores have been replaced by high price and expensive ones around the areas. Making residents of these particular communities, spend more money on their first necessities almost every day and damaging their budgets. I personally have been struggling myself with so many “questions” that I have been asking to many people around me and myself about the huge housing problem in California. Because it is not only happening in L.A., but all around the state. I have been feeling disappointed in many ways about how life(in general), has become so difficult in this city. I left my own country several years ago, thinking that “life” would be “better” in this country. But all what I have been witnessing in the last years, it is the opposite of what I thought. Even though, as the article says, this gentrification has been affected mostly Latino and African American communities, I also have seen how this situation also affects a huge White community. I work in a place in which a have white co-workers from many different states around the whole nation. White people from states like Louisiana, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Georgia for example, move to California looking for a better life opportunities also; just like immigrants from other countries do. But once they start working and paying rent and bills in this state, they realize it that life in California is not as “easier and happier” as they thought it would be. I have talked to many of them, and they also feel so frustrated about the housing and other social problems in the city of L.A.. They have found out how difficult is to afford a house for example in Los Angeles(or surrounding areas). But they do not want to go back to their states because of the low job salaries they offer. Some of them support their beloved ones sending money from here. Just like we, immigrants, do support the ones in our own countries. But after asking myself so many questions about all these issues, I have to remember and accept the fact that we live in a country that calls itself as a “capitalist country”(we know it is not in many ways). In which money rules. And in which private actions and the look for wealth, at any price, are encouraging to exist. To me, the clue to solve these social and economic problems is found on education. I truly believe, as the article mentions at the end, that success in any community, city, or country, should be measured by the way we treat not only the poor ones, but the entire world. How we treat our planet and nature, how we respect our history, how we treat our neighbors, our co-workers, people around us, our own families, and ourselves. Thank you for your time.

    Reply
  46. Shauntice Randolph January 17, 2018 at 8:15 am

    This blog has completely open my mind to how our city council handles their people. Therefore, this has made me even more interested in my communities problems and social changes that is going on around me. Well for one these people don’t give a damn about “US” as minority they only care more about the people with money; tourist, students’(USC, Out of State, etc) celebrities, and many more. I’m actually quite disappointed in what I read. Here you have advocates that strongly believe the project will lead to eviction and poor renters. Newsflash it’s already happening. This has been happening for quite some time in Downtown Los Angeles. I have seen it with my own eyes. When I used to live down there 2 years ago. People began to get evictions notices front and back. This happened after they received the approval from the city to renew part of Alexandria Hotel (low income)to glams and shimmer. Therefore, I believe that social justice does turn against their own people and does lead to people moving out of the city. So much that people are moving to Palmdale and San Bernardino for example my Aunt.When it comes to the issue-Gentrification in Macarthur Park sadly is just another prime example of people getting kicked out their own community and pushed out further because housing is unaffordable. This comes to show how the common citizens; non-profits, community leaders all support these damn developments and have total control over people lives and non-profits not fighting or directing these people to city hall. Why must it be that way? When Developers have so many resources and out of all those resources it hasn’t been helpful to the community. Now about the Gentrification has been a good impact on LA. The city has created jobs and streets have been a lot cleaner. But still there is no full public assistance for the people in LA. So what we need to do as a community is to fight for “OURS” either it being affordable housing and attend the meetings at city hall. This will show councilman “WE CARE” and we need help. There are so many issues that are displayed on the internet and T.V. an no one’s doing anything about it. We shouldn’t voice our opinions behind a screen like the president. We need to come together and “ACT”. The consequences behind not acting will be the same results that have been shown to us in our communities. And that’s right NO CHANGE.

    Reply
  47. WINISHA GRIFFIN January 18, 2018 at 1:59 am

    Gentrification effecting the poor and pleasing the rich in Los Angeles. For the last 5 years I have noticed a change first in Downtown LA, next in my neighborhood and now in other parts of LA. When I moved out of my mothers house and got own apartment Downtown LA I noticed that it was only Blacks, Browns, drug addicts, prostitute’s, and homeless people roaming the grimy streets of LA and it was also urine and human poop on the grounds, Now when I walk downtown on Broadway I do not see not one homeless person nor does it smell like urine. As I walk further down Broadway I see new buildings like condos and people of Europe descent walking their dogs, drinking coffee or jogging as if before there was no poverty. In my community there was only majority Latinos and a hand full of Blacks. As the years went by more Caucasian people started to buy up my block for an example there is a building on the corner of my cross streets and there is no writing on the front, the front of the building remains closed, and the entrance is in the back where it is gated black for the public can not see. There is also a new Caucasian family who just bought the biggest house on my block and its kind of weird because they do not speak and I am assuming it is because they know that they are about to take over and their conscious is bothering them. While they move in our community the cost of living for us will go and up and the cost of things will and did go up, people began to see the drastic change and they are moving including the addicts.
    There are other parts of Los Angeles that is going through gentrification like the city of Inglewood. Inglewood has been going through changes since I lived over there around the time I was in elementary school in the year of like 1999. From what I seen they have knocked down numerous apartments that was located on Century BLVD where they are now shopping centers. If you walk a little bit down Century you will see a new casino that is later going to be a resort with a casino. Although there have been gentrification going on for years after years I think it is not fair to those who are poor and are living from pay check to pay check. When it is gentrification for the rich they have numerous of options and different places to move to so, I think that the government should be more considerate of the poor than the rich because the poor will suffer.

    Reply
  48. Victor Pearson January 18, 2018 at 2:06 am

    The vast amount of “development” going on in the inner city should be considered criminal. Gentrification is a destructive element in our society that is morally, ethically and spiritually vile and physically destructive to poor and less financially stable people. I can’t understand how our governmental agencies would allow the development of such projects that would displace tens of thousands of people. From my perspective, when a city official caters to the influence of wealthy developers, they are doing nothing short of accepting bribes which is a crime. We need to have strict laws in place that would not allow any development to occur that would displace large numbers of people. If a development was to be approved it would have to make consessions for those families and individuals affected to have equal housing provided especially if those families are on fixed or limited income. We are constantly told that the jobs created from these developments would be beneficial to the community but they fail to say this is only temporary during construction and minor at best for permanent jobs that these displaced people will likely lack the skills to acquire any positions. The article points out the truth that poor people are not represented by the city officials and should be held accountable for their selling out of the people. Just like the “No child left behind” act there should be a similar act for communities. If we are the “United States” then we all “development” together.

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  49. Jennifer M. January 18, 2018 at 7:36 pm

    This Article brings knowledge and enlightment to the people being displaced and going to be displaced out of their neighborhoods. The people to blame for is the whole communities not just the people being displaced because no one is taking a stand and be involved in the communities issues. People that organize non-profit organizations to help the people in need like people who are being devoted, but most people in need don’t know about most resources. Most importantly no one wants to help these non-profit organizations. Most wealthy people help gain or raise money to help organizations provide for the people in need. Other weathly people are not really helping out they are bring more harm to our community by building more shopping centers that attract us people and waste money on unnecessary thing and making these wealthy people more rich and then we ask ourself why are we in the situation we are with not enough money to pay our bills. Instead of us people especially middle class people like me should stand up for our rights and not let these wealthy people step all over us. If we the people want to see changes in our community we have to be the change not just seat back and just complain about everything that is going wrong and start making this community a better place for everyone.

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  50. Daniel Montano January 18, 2018 at 11:39 pm

    Adding a new Starbucks and sushi restaurant is not going to help, the Westlake / MacArthur development seemed like a good idea, however, in recent years the living conditions have deteriorated. The homeless population has increased. The city of Los Angeles should have had a contingency plan to deal with many residents being displaced. As for the council members and Non-profit Organization who are accused of backroom deals should be investigated by a newly form committee. Those who are found guilty should be fined and imprison in extreme cases.

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  51. Michelle Valdez January 19, 2018 at 11:47 am

    this article sheds light on what is really going on with non profit organizations, they will claim to help the ones struggling but will jump to the first big hand out that comes by and don’t really look into what can or will happen. the one thing I’ve learned in this life is that everyone is in it for themselves, not a lot of people are truly there to help and support them. Los Angeles rent is already expensive and when they build new high end hotels, or high end shopping centers they will raise the prices and this is creating a bigger problem to the low income family’s living in the area. I really don’t see how building this nice high-end hotel will help this community. instead they should build them for the low income family’s to help decrease the homeless population in Los Angeles. LA is already a city filled with poverty, and high rent, and living costs, there is no need to displace hundreds of hard working family just to build these fancy building that are outrageously expensive, this city is already done so much to the population of the lower class, these people don’t have the time to seek proper education because of how many hours they work a week just trying to make the rent let alone bills and other family expenses. i just don’t know how some of thees people can sleep at night knowing that they are the reason for the poverty level. again this does not help anyone but the people building these buildings,they are already loaded there is no reason to contribute to them.

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  52. michelle Valdez January 19, 2018 at 6:18 pm

    this article sheds light on what is really going on with non profit organizations, they will claim to help the ones struggling but will jump to the first big hand out that comes by and don’t really look into what can or will happen. the one thing I’ve learned in this life is that everyone is in it for themselves, not a lot of people are truly there to help and support them. Los Angeles rent is already expensive and when they build new high end hotels, or high end shopping centers they will raise the prices and this is creating a bigger problem to the low income family’s living in the area. I really don’t see how building this nice high-end hotel will help this community. instead they should build them for the low income family’s to help decrease the homeless population in Los Angeles. LA is already a city filled with poverty, and high rent, and living costs, there is no need to displace hundreds of hard working family just to build these fancy building that are outrageously expensive, this city is already done so much to the population of the lower class, these people don’t have the time to seek proper education because of how many hours they work a week just trying to make the rent let alone bills and other family expenses. i just don’t know how some of thees people can sleep at night knowing that they are the reason for the poverty level. again this does not help anyone but the people building these buildings,they are already loaded there is no reason to contribute to them

    Reply
  53. Ivana Rodriguez January 19, 2018 at 10:36 pm

    This blog helps understand gentrification and those who it affects. It also opens the eyes of those who enjoy the new and stylish mod cons of Downtown Los Angeles. Although it seems as though there is progress being made, the scarcity of land is increasing. That being said the lower class need to speak up and get involved in the things occurring, otherwise sooner than later the percentage of homeless families will increase. All these luxury hotels, apartments, restaurants, bars and stores only benefit the wealthy. Meanwhile the lower class is dealing with increase in rents and it is a lot harder for families to progress because there is an increase of property values. As more and more buildings are being renovated and improving, the streets are getting overcrowded with homeless. The investors find it easy to use their connections and displace poor communities. Those connections end up being the people who are supposed to help us, our own representatives and all they do is sell us out. There are a lot bigger
    issues and all their focus is on the rich. I personally live approximately 1o minutes away from downtown and as time passes more and more people are living in the streets. Every route to Downtown LA consists of homeless and instead of providing services to help improve that, they simply walk over it and move it closer to the communities. We need more leaders who will really improve and not put to the side the lower class.

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  54. Layra Correa January 20, 2018 at 2:26 am

    After reading this article it made me realize how unaware many of us including myself are about our communities and how middle class and low-income families are being affected. It is very sad to see families being kicked out of their homes where they have built memories and created stories due to new developments. This article has made me realize that people in my community are also being affected due to new developments. I live in South Gate and South Gate is very different today then what it was when I moved here 8 years ago. South Gate has built many new shopping centers such as Azalea and CrossRoads and they are planning on building more. Each and everyday I see more and more people on the streets and I never understood or stopped to think why but after this article I have come to realize that because of these developments it has driven people out of their homes because they cannot afford to keep their houses. In my community, people are worrying about trying to make it a nicer community by building new stores, restaurants, and places for entertaining purposes instead of using that money to build homes for those low-income families. Today, I see so many people selling items on the streets to earn a living and it still is not enough. At the barbershop I work in, my boss as well as my co-workers have told me that as much as they would like to go home early from work sometimes or not work on the holidays they just can’t because missing one day will make them fall behind on money. They have to work long hours everyday just to be able to support themselves, their families, and pay for bills and rent because today living in South Gate is much more expensive than it was years ago. It is sad the fact that none of us are informed about what is going on in our communities, we need to be aware of what is going on to be able to unite and be more involved in our communities and fight for new homes for low-income families rather than new developments. Today, many people stick to jobs that they do not enjoy at all but the reason they are still there is because of the money. These people including my parents cannot leave their job because it is possible that they can lose their homes because they will not be able to afford living in our community. Los Angeles has a history of kicking people out of their homes because of new developments, take Chavez Ravine for example; families were kicked out of their communities to build the Dodger Stadium. It is sad to know that Los Angeles continues to drive people out of their homes because of new developments.

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  55. Montserrat L. January 20, 2018 at 7:17 am

    I feel that gentrification is such a huge issue in our generation and it saddens me that not much is being done about it. With so many new condominiums and apartment complexes being built in Los Angeles, soon all of us lower class individuals will have to find another city to live in. I have only lived in Los Angeles for about 6 years now but the changes that have been made are so drastic. Every year, more and more homeless people are on the street and there have even been times where i see a homeless kids asking for money. Soon enough more families will be put out on the street and the poverty level will rise. I also think that it is so absurd that investors waste so much money on condominiums that not many people in LA can even afford. There are currently two new apartment complexes on Pico and Olive and you can see through the windows, how many apartments are empty. I think that the city and all these investors should start building affordable housing and start trying to lower our poverty rate because if not, by the next ten years there will only be upper class people living in the city of Los Angeles.

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  56. fredi lagunas January 20, 2018 at 7:53 am

    It’s not surprising that more and more developers branch out of downtown to more districts that are more rundown and filled with people of color, they are the easiest target since they are not organized enough to combat big developers. This reminds me of the Councilmen’s Curen Price words that were mostly for developers and the development of the 9th district to bring in more revenue than to help its own citizens that have been living there most of their lives. More and more I can’t help but think that the city government of LA well become the lapdogs of rich people not that they already are, but to the point where Los Angeles will turn into New Las Vegas and not the Los Angeles we know and love. People need to find affordable housing so they can provide for their family and not solely focus on how to pay for next month’s rent, it affects what education they can give their children, schools with good education and funds are usually located in neighborhoods that have families with average incomes and not in poor ones. The housing crisis in Los Angeles is ethically wrong point blank, It is turning into a city for money and not for the people.

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  57. Gus January 20, 2018 at 8:13 am

    As a person who lives in an area in danger of gentrification, this whole idea scares me. Clearing out the poor to make way for the highest bidder is not the way our city should handle its affairs. I know that some sort of gentrification will always occur. but it should not endanger the livelihoods of so many. Revenue is important for a city, that I understand, but it should not come at the cost of others. As Los Angeles grows, it will surely attract more people, and those who do not own a home are in severe danger of losing what they have to rising prices. On the matter of gentrified areas being safer, it is sad that this is the reality. If it takes higher taxes to keep our neighborhoods safer, I am sure that people are willing to pay them, but the city must not make it safe only for those in condos and hotel areas. We are all citizens of Los Angeles. The city must remember that those who live in our areas are those in its working class, the ones that usually do manual labor. As the sons and daughters of those manual laborers hopefully strive to get a better education, they will surely want to come back to the neighborhood they are from, and they will want to better it themselves.

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  58. silvia aceves January 20, 2018 at 8:25 am

    Gentrification is growing in an alarming rate in Los Angeles. This is so upsetting because many people that I know personally are victims of gentrification. Gentrification is causing families to relocate. Some are not so lucky and end up in the streets or shelters because they can no longer afford where to live. People have been living in the affected areas for decades, many generations have made a life and great memories. Due to the outcome they end up homeless and are losing their homes that they have worked so hard to call their own. The prices in rent have gone up immensely and it is impossible to buy a home because they are also very expensive. From my understanding after reading this article, it states that gentrification is a good thing. I believe that it is only convenient for the wealthier individuals. I do not believe that these outcomes will reduce gang and violence, nor homelessness. i have personally seen the changes in Down Town L.A. and all the moms and pops stores no longer exist, they have been replaced by a “trendy” coffee shops full of hipsters or some big corporation stores like Burlington. The streets are the worst part, because there are so many more homeless people and they are also relocating to areas like South Central L.A. Overall, gentrification is a benefit for the rich and an unjust dilemma for the lower-class.

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  59. Ariana Hall January 20, 2018 at 10:41 am

    After reading this article, I slightly became concerned about what new projects are about to appear in my community. I remember, years ago people in certain apartments were evicted so developers can build a Costco.. I don’t find it fair that people have to find a new home outside of the city because the cost of living it becoming too expensive. Why don’t these businesses build in areas that aren’t well established and actually need development? he average rent price in Los Angeles in $2100. With minimum wage starting at $10.50 an hour, $15 starting 2020, people are barley making enough just to pay their rent. That doesn’t include utilities, food, and necessities. I don’t believe low income housing is necessarily they answer. The government is not able to fund all these programs the communities needs. However, I believe the cost of labor needs to increase while the cost of living remains the same.

    Reply
  60. Omar January 20, 2018 at 11:41 am

    At some point, I totally agree that gentrification places the culture and the roods of Angelenos that have lived in this city for decades at risk. Principally, minorities and the low class are being targeting by this “ modernization” which is said to propel the economy of the city. Although, This poor people have lived here in Los Angeles for decades, we can not denied that modernisation has placed a new living standard for the people of LA. As I walk around my city and see this city every day, I am amazed by the beauty of this city colliding with the new and the old. I am aware that I will not be here forever because, unfortunately, I will be one of those poor renters affected by gentrification. I am upset that at some point we are being displaced in order to conform the middle class and the upper class. But what absolutely perturbs me is the fact that the government is totally corrupted, how politicians respond to the powerful sponsors that basically have control towards the elected representatives and it leaves me no type of hope for the future. This is probably one of the major reason why people (the common people) give up on politics, because we all assume is the same. I find myself on stage one again , discouraged, with no interests on politics , but this behaviour is the one that led us here. Since the day we lost interest, the social pressure towards politicians diminished and this allowed them to expand their power and to put first their own interests and the ones of those who sponsored them. It saddens me to know that few people stand by our side, but sadly we are not even standing up for ourselves neither confronting or informing ourselves to what currently is happening around our own city. Gentrification is an issue that politicians do not want to respond because it is not convenient for them, but this is a lesson to the poor, because we have forgotten the power we are able to have on our hands, democracy has always being present, but as well as politicians we have decided to look away, to be lazy, let others take decisions for us, and do the reasoning for us. This self defeating attitude have taken us where we are. Now, it is up for the individuals to either change this, or continue living life as if others have the answers to all our problems. Politicians have responded to the housing crisis, they simply forgot about the poor and the diversity that existed and once made Angelenos proud. In my own opinion, the future of Los Angeles is clearly uncertain, and nobody is able to predict whether this gentrification will be beneficial for our community or not, but what I have some type or certainty is that our voice is crucial for the future of our communities and that gentrification could have been prevented if the common people would have been informed and politically engaged.

    Reply
  61. Edwin Gonzalez January 20, 2018 at 11:46 am

    I do agree that gentrification is currently drifting our people away little by little. I thought America was the land of opportunities. With the reef project currently in session and Trump as our president, America is really changing after all in just a blink of an eye. Immigrants are being deported back to their countries, as well as being evicted from the community. What social class other than Hispanics and Blacks suffer economically the most? None other than foreigners. You show up to McArthur Park and its nothing but Hispanics. Hispanics looking for jobs, you see people having their own businesses in the sidewalks, while others being arrested trying to thrive in life. One of these quotes that caught my attention I have to say is very true. “A leader with the basic ability to think critically could actually see no benefits from these developments going to the poor people whom they are supposed to represent” Most people living in the McArthur park community barely have the money to support themselves as well as keeping up with their rent. Anyone from the Hispanic community knows how bad conditions are in this area, you see a lot of people sleeping in the streets, yet they want to construct as well as reconstruct McArthur Park, creating Luxury apartments. Another thing that was pointed out about politicians with no interest to the poor was the following quote “Poor renters in Los Angeles were being aggressively displaced and the so-called “liberal” or “progressive” politicians at city hall and many progressive organizations that included labor just looked the other way.” It all comes down to the politicians benefit and to those of middle class and high class. After reading this blog, it made me recall of what D.Price Jr. had mentioned in his speech, “ rents are going up anyway” which basically means that this politician isn’t doing anything to stop prices from increasing, instead he is selling out his own people by dispersing of them. Just as Professor Chamba said, “don’t go along to get along” this is how I currently feel. I feel like the poor community is being sold out. I also agree with this quote because my family and I have experienced this ourselves “In addition, many evil landlords also concoct well-coordinated schemes to evict renters. So, a different class of individual with the ability to pay market rate’s rents could move into their units. Two years ago right before we moved out from our old apartment, our landlord began to increase the rent, leaving no hope for those who didn’t have the sufficient funds to pay for rent. I began to notice that tenants that have lived in the apartments began moving out because rent was too high. Eventually I began to notice people of middle class moving into the units. Rent was high as it was. I won’t give numbers for personal reasons but throughout time, I began to see more middle class people in a community of lower class people. In conclusion to this, the lower class community is slowly getting wiped out.

    Reply
  62. Omar Ramirez January 20, 2018 at 11:50 am

    At some point, I totally agree that gentrification places the culture and the roods of Angelenos that have lived in this city for decades at risk. Principally, minorities and the low class are being targeting by this “ modernization” which is said to propel the economy of the city. Although, This poor people have lived here in Los Angeles for decades, we can not denied that modernisation has placed a new living standard for the people of LA. As I walk around my city and see this city every day, I am amazed by the beauty of this city colliding with the new and the old. I am aware that I will not be here forever because, unfortunately, I will be one of those poor renters affected by gentrification. I am upset that at some point we are being displaced in order to conform the middle class and the upper class. But what absolutely perturbs me is the fact that the government is totally corrupted, how politicians respond to the powerful sponsors that basically have control towards the elected representatives and it leaves me no type of hope for the future. This is probably one of the major reason why people (the common people) give up on politics, because we all assume is the same. I find myself on stage one again , discouraged, with no interests on politics , but this behaviour is the one that led us here. Since the day we lost interest, the social pressure towards politicians diminished and this allowed them to expand their power and to put first their own interests and the ones of those who sponsored them. It saddens me to know that few people stand by our side, but sadly we are not even standing up for ourselves neither confronting or informing ourselves to what currently is happening around our own city. Gentrification is an issue that politicians do not want to respond because it is not convenient for them, but this is a lesson to the poor, because we have forgotten the power we are able to have on our hands, democracy has always being present, but as well as politicians we have decided to look away, to be lazy, let others take decisions for us, and do the reasoning for us. This self defeating attitude have taken us where we are. Now, it is up for the individuals to either change this, or continue living life as if others have the answers to all our problems. Politicians have responded to the housing crisis, they simply forgot about the poor and the diversity that existed and once made Angelenos proud. In my own opinion, the future of Los Angeles is clearly uncertain, and nobody is able to predict whether this gentrification will be beneficial for our community or not, but what I have some type or certainty is that our voice is crucial for the future of our communities and that gentrification could have been prevented if the common people would have been informed and politically engaged.

    Reply
  63. Junior Aguilar January 20, 2018 at 7:54 pm

    As the future of Los Angeles continues to change over time it will become difficult to make rent fair for low income families since new businesses will continue to expand. After reading this article I agree with all the points that were mentioned but if I was able to add a few things it would be to use more statistic numbers of how many individuals are being affected around the area and how many of those people will have to move away. I would also like to hear an estimate of how much the rent will be increased in certain areas and whether this increase in rent can still be livable for low income families and whether or not there are programs that can help families to make housing affordable. Overall this article makes good points and being a resident of Los Angeles I can say that things have change a lot over the past few years including new residents entering certain communities that were once known as dangerous. This can later develop to low income families having to move out as mention in the article because new residence are willing to pay more and will eventually kick out the poor. After reading this article all I can say is keep up the good work and hopefully I get to read more articles like this.

    Reply
  64. Veronica Almontes January 21, 2018 at 3:03 am

    After reading this article, it has made me realize that not many people have any knowledge of what is happening in our community, and that there is so much missing information about the process of getting your voice heard. I do notice, I have noticed the fact that all these new buildings are being made and that they are really expensive, not any median class can afford a luxury apartment. I know that the increase in all these rents make it impossible for someone to be independent. I myself have been trying to move out of my mom’s house for a while now, but nothing fits my budget within my community maybe not even my city anymore. Because obviously I want to live in a nice, safe community but those places are usually more expensive than living “in the ghetto”. Where hearing gunshots being fired every other day is normal for a lot of us. Where their is a liquor store in every corner. How can we be financially stable if most of us work only to have a place over our head. Sometimes we don’t even get to spend time with our families because were too busy working, trying to make enough money by the end of the week. Im glad that I’m getting informed more about politics.

    Reply
  65. LaShanna Anderson January 21, 2018 at 3:12 am

    After reading this blog as well as the comments of others. I am lost for words… The fact that developers and council members are working together to remove the low income families and increase the higher income residents to move back to the inner cities as well as downtown area. They have increased the appeal of Los Angeles, trying to form it into another 1800 Rome. To produce more income and tourist attractions. Unlike Vegas, Nevada one of the biggest tourist venues. Their living arrangements are more affordable do the fact that the casinos and the “strip” makes enough money to afford the tax of the state. Whereas, Los Angeles is growing in landmarks and luxury housing, the government will not try to find a way for living accommodations for everyone.

    Reply
  66. Ricardo Colin January 21, 2018 at 6:11 am

    After reading this article I realize how unaware I am about my community. Not only me, but the people in my surroundings as well. I learn how middle class and low-income families are being the most affected in my community today. I see so many people selling items on the streets to earn a living and it still is not enough. Today, many people have jobs that they do not enjoy at all but the reason they are still there is because of the money. These people including my family cannot leave their jobs because rent must be payed. We cannot afford to get kick out of our homes. Los Angeles has a history of kicking people out of their homes because of new developments. Gentrification is now spreading throughout LA and it’s hard to really miss it. Knowing that this is what is causing all the lower-class people to be removed from their homes is unbelievable. Many people have years leaving the same home. There homes contain hundreds of memories. Money does control politics and with that there is power. Using this type of power to displace hundreds of families to make condos and hotels and museums is wrong. Ok, some people would argue that gentrification is good and it can be, it does help clean up violence in communities but it also tears these communities apart. The culture is removed, the community is being driven away and it shouldn’t be that way because to some people these houses/apartments are all they have or can afford. I believed Los Angeles is being reconstructed for the working-class people and are driving away the “poor people” from somewhere they are so comfortable and familiar with just because they will not be able to afford it anymore. The problem of poverty and homelessness is something that our government ignores most of the time. They know these people cannot afford any lawyer to fight for them. This means that poor people are left at the mercy of everyone else with a voice greater than their own and in this case the ones with the greatest voices of all are the wealthy property developers. In the battle for scarce real estate in an already completely developed city those with the least will lose the most and those with the most will continue get more. It is a vicious cycle and it will continue to propagate as long as those people we elect to supposedly represent us all in government continue to be beholden only to wealth and their own political aspirations.

    Reply
  67. Elizabeth Rodriguez January 21, 2018 at 7:01 pm

    It is indeed sad, that poor people are being kicked out of their own community because of rich developers and their business. How can families who can’t afford to live anywhere else, be kicked out of the houses they have been leaving for years? These people have no heart, or morals, but are only interested in making money. Nobody, not even social justice activists are helping these poor families. These people have no where to go, they would go homeless if they were to get kicked out of their houses. It is unfair and disappointing how Los Angeles has changed as a city, but I believe this wouldn’t be happening if the people would be well informed about their rights. It is important for the community to take a stance, stay involved, and participate in their community. They need to gather their people and fight for what is right. Let their voices be heard and pressure their city council to act. Most importantly, they need to inform themselves about who their city councilman is, and to kick him out by voting. Voting is very important in choosing city councils. City councils make laws for the city that affect individuals who live in them, either good or bad. But these people lack the importance of voting, some don’t vote or simply don’t care. That is why the same leaders are in office for so many years and do nothing for the poor people. Instead of making luxurious buildings in Los Angeles, leaders in the city should work on how well our children are doing in school and how we treat the poor. The children are the future, getting them well educated will prevent them from these type of situations; they will be able to afford housing and a better future.

    Reply
  68. Byron Miller January 21, 2018 at 7:15 pm

    This blog shows how corrupt the city officials we elect into our communities devise plans and agendas based on part of what might’ve been conveyed to the public at hand. Displacement of Angeleno’s is not a new or current problem, this has been happening in LOST Angeles for decades. Battle of Chavez Ravine, a lot of us were either too young to know what transpired or never had the prior knowledge of what took place in 1957-62. Supporters back then like the supporters now were all on-board with establishing new ground at the expense and livelihood of the displaced Angeleno’s. The same demise revisited decades later though never really diminished in the first place.
    Different time and age with the exact same business practices. Los Angeles is a movie capital, a place to be seen and discovered, a place where dreaming can be had or nite mares become a reality. As of lately Angeleno’s are being duped once again by the word Development. Los Angeles also seem to be in competition with neighboring cities as well to generate revenue, which allows for more spending on frivolous high rises, stadiums Angeleno’s didn’t ask for in which most Angeleno’s couldn’t really afford (tickets to the game) based on the average cost of living. Los Angeles has seen it’s fair share of these so-called developments, but what are they developing? The community needs programs that could assist single-mothers/fathers who struggle to make ends meet, programs designed to help and enhance children ability to succeed in life, affordable housing where a family doesn’t have to live in fear with the possible demise of being put out of homes that they have known since a child. Developers such as Walter O’ Malley to the likes of developers like Carusso all blow smokescreens to the constituents of Los Angeles by fooling them into thinking facade as such are needed in the city to compete and bring a solution to a city that was founded on diversity. Fat cats with the Fat wallets has always had a say so, and when challenged…. money has always been a motivating fix-the-problem right type of outlook. There is a numerous amount of sheer complicity at the city level as well as the county. Question is if we can’t trust the city elected officials to help the PEOPLE of Los Angeles then how can we place our complete confidence and backing to incompetent leadership.

    Reply
  69. Elizabeth Sanchez January 21, 2018 at 7:58 pm

    This article, made me realize how greedy people can be. Developers don’t care about low-income communities being dislocated, all they care is the profit their new project will bring them. They’re gentrifying Los Angeles with no mercy of the poor individuals. My people work hard everyday and it’s barely enough to feed their families and pay their rent. Then here comes a developer and leaves a paper in their doorstep saying they have one month to leave their home because a new hotel will be built there. It’s a slap in the face of these people, they have no money or any place to go. So they go on and find another apartment with a higher rent price, leaving them with less money to fill their empty tummies. I strongly believe we all have the right to affordable housing but these developers are too focused in satisfying the tourist’s experience and not their community’s living.

    Reply
  70. Brittany Williams January 21, 2018 at 11:07 pm

    I’m in favor of reconstructing the community but there is no need to displace residents who have been living in the community for years. Displacing residents in Los Angeles including myself, I am not in an agreement of residents being placed out of their homes. People who are displaced become homeless or forced to move away from their jobs, families, and communities. Living in Los Angeles we’re now facing higher rents, skyrocketing property values, and a cost of living has become unmanageable, even when working multiple jobs. Gentrification is a two edged sword for me because one its only supporting a better life for the rich and the people who will only be able to afford to live in these high price areas. It will be harder for the lower income working families to survive in Los Angeles. My question is who’s really getting the benefit, because honestly it’s not the residents whose been living in their community for years. In my eyes the winners would be the real estate investors and the developers who would make a hefty profit, and the wealthier incomers who get to live out their life in these high priced homes, and condominium buildings.

    Reply
  71. Francisco Gregorio January 21, 2018 at 11:09 pm

    After having familiar discussions in class. I made the connection of how the people in the Mc Arthur Park and Westlake area are experiencing the same situation as the people in the south L.A area. We as people of our communities should get more involve on how our representatives present our communities. Projects like “The Lake on Wilshire” shouldn’t be a thing if we truly knew the people who represent our communities. In south L.A homelessness is becoming a major problem. Every year more and more people are giving in to the life on the streets. “Skid row”, which is already one of the worst parts of the city is becoming hell on earth. Many factors come into play on why people are becoming homeless in a state that can be its own country. One of the main reasons is the high amount of rent that renters pay every year. Each year the amount of rent for most renters in south L.A is rising. So, these poor, hard-working renters are struggling every year to pay the rent. The truth is these renters are one pay check away from becoming homeless.

    Reply
  72. Alexey January 22, 2018 at 1:01 am

    Your article made me realize even further how inept the government is at solving most problems. The funny (regretful) thing about the housing crisis is that it was caused by government intervention. Now you need another government intervention to solve problems that were created by government intervention. Then you will need further intervention to fix all the mess created by previous interventions and so on. It is an infinite loop.
    The low vacancy rates and the housing crisis itself are the unintentional effect of housing market regulation, rent control included. The housing cost is artificially made this high. We wouldn’t be having this conversation if it wasn’t. Cities with a deregulated market aren’t having problems like LA has. They have housing available for all price options but most is clustered toward the low end. Cities with a deregulated housing market have most of their housing on the cheaper end, contrary to LA which has housing clustered on the high end. It is paramount that we recognize what caused the problem in the first place. We cannot be dealing with the consequences forever, we must address the cause of the issue. The cause of the housing crisis is a deranged state and local government.

    Reply
  73. Giselle Castor January 22, 2018 at 1:13 am

    I think this article really embodies what gentrification is, and it answered many of the questions I had regarding it. I have lived in Los Angeles my whole life and it has definitely changed because of gentrification. The streets that were once occupied by the homeless are now occupied by residential homes and stadiums. I was surprised to read how all of the development in Los Angeles are being driven by corruption. City council has public meetings regarding development, and they make it seem as if we have a chance in stopping it. It is so sad how they give false hope to these people in danger of being displaced. When in fact these council members have relationships with developers, and are influenced to support their projects. What surprised me more was that it is not just our politicians turning their backs it is also non profits and union organizations. The purpose of union organizations and nonprofits is to help those in need, and instead they are selling out by supporting these developments. I’ve always trusted non-profits and believed that they are good for the community, and it is sad to realize that they take advantage of this trust. It is so sad that these non-profits would go as far as to use residents to testify in their support. Is funding that much more important than the future of working class families? I don’t think so. Many argue that gentrification is creating progression for our communities. I do not think that progression can exist when not everyone is benefiting from it. Development has indeed decreased crime and it has increased the values of homes, but who is benefiting from that. As stated in the article, the income of a working class family is approximately $24,000. These families can’t afford to live in the communities where gentrification has made a positive impact. Instead they are being pushed out of them, and to me that is not progression. In the article it stated that many residents of Boyle Heights are resorting to militant actions, and this just goes to show how many residents are feeling. It is so sad that some have to resort to this because the government does nothing to protect residents from gentrification. I can see some gentrification slowly taking place in my community, and I know that as more land becomes scarce more development will take place. I too fear that my family and neighbors will be pushed out of my community, and it worries me that our government does not feel urgency regarding this problem. I was unaware that gentrification can have a negative effect on everyone. Due to people being pushed out there will be greater commute, and this is bad for our environment. I feel like nothing will be done regarding gentrification until everyone realizes that it can negatively affect us all.

    Reply
  74. Ryle Pangilinan January 22, 2018 at 2:58 am

    California is an ever-evolving nation. As new infrastructures are being built the life of those people in the community begins to prosper and blossom- that’s if you and your family are able to adapt. Day by day this is the reoccurring problem that our congressmen and congresswomen are trying to find a solution to. How do we make sure our community thrive along with the people in it? Seems very difficult to straighten out. Individuals that are not able to adapt eventually are force out or take the homeless route. Major developments such as Penthouses and condominiums, new malls, new pop shop stores, new museums, etc. in Los Angeles has increased the price of property ownership, and even public transportation cost. Whether gentrification is successful, I believe that can only be answered by those who can afford to live in a gentrified community. I view gentrification both an advantage and a disadvantage for the community. For once, it will reestablish the community by offering new job opportunities – coffee shops, museums, clothing stores, departments stores – staggering major decline in crime rate, and overall better public and private schools. There is a positive about developing a neighborhood which new shopping mall for example, will give thousands of the inhabitant’s jobs thus creating more wealth for the improvised community. Shopping malls like Glendale galleria only generate revenue for the city of Glendale and not other community so its better to buy within your city. Ultimately, it is a choice we all have to live by, what do you want to see more in your neighborhood? Liquor Stores and Marijuana/Med Shops OR theater, parking lots, parks, and establishments such as Starbucks, I choose the latter. I completely agree that our children should be the top priority and how well they are doing in the educational institutions but how can they study comfortably when their neighborhood is littered with crimes and manipulative gang recruiters? Poor will only suffer if they cannot keep up and learn to adapt.

    Reply
  75. Andrea Renteria January 22, 2018 at 5:47 am

    This has been the main issue among Los Angeles for the last half decade or so. I personally believe that rent has gone up and will continue to go up within these communities due to these new pop up cafes and so on. Let’s be honest these leisure activities that are being placed all around downtown LA are use less to those of the working class. When will they have the time to stop by a cafe to buy a $6 cup of coffee. It’s obvious that these sort of “spots” are being brought up here to invite and entertain the upper class who all they have is time and money. But we will never put an end to this sort of scrutiny unless we ourselves stand up. I am actually disappointed in myself that i didn’t know about this beforehand but now that I am aware , I feel angry and i want to stand for more than just myself. I also find it pathetic for independent organizations to just sell themselves out for the quick dollar. Its pathetic. It really opens doors for me .I am able to see that not organizations are as good as they say they are. And as for the councilman . If they can’t stand for the majority of their district then why are they running at all . they are feed the public lies upon lies . They know how to switch up their moods. Once they are in front a community they root for the poor and act like they care for the children , but once they are in front of politicians and businessmen , they show their true colors. thank you.

    Reply
  76. Stephen Hernandez January 22, 2018 at 7:28 am

    After reading this article I feel more convinced that there is a serious problem within our own city council, and that Gentrification is happening right before my very eyes. Developers have council members in their pockets, and they offer little to no resistance. Developers go unchallenged by community leaders, and are free to construct large-scale projects. While yes they bring jobs, they also displace families who can’t afford to travel hours on end for work. They push families further and further out of Los Angeles. That in return affects for example a single mother whose children can no longer attend a local school because now they have to worry about finding a new place to live. Children are the ones who suffer the most in the end because if their education suffers from the start their futures will too. Los Angeles itself has become so crowded that developers can’t build out, but must build up in order to maximize profit. In doing so they build massive condo’s, hotel’s and movie theaters which require the demolition of homes to low income families who will never be able to live there in the first place. It’s horrible thing to witness, but I also know that this is the price of progression and change.

    Reply

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