Will weed take us to the promised land?

“We can’t have a civil society if everyone is smoking pot.” Governor Brown told a group of journalists last year.  The governor might have been somewhat sarcastic with that statement.  But it is worth to explore the complexities of legalizing this drug. The passage of Proposition 64 in 2016 made the growing and selling of marijuana legal for recreational purposes. California has been right, front and center trying to decriminalize marijuana for many years. It became the first state in the country to legalize medical marijuana in 1996.

This pot legalization has been introduced with great fanfare and many people optimistically expect to see the same success that took place in Colorado where millions were collected in taxes in the first year voters approved it. Evidently, there are many complex issues that need to be tackled.  But most conversations appear to solely be focused on the new revenues that will be collected.  

Yes, conversations on the social costs as well as how communities will be impacted are literally non-existent. For starters, there are still no clear guidelines to be followed by those who provide public safety in cities on what to do when people drive high. And there is confusion as to how to define when one is impaired because he or she has smoked marijuana. Evidently, balancing of all interests and concerns has a been a challenge in the legalization of marijuana.  It appears that those who want to see dispensaries at every street corner have a bigger microphone.  People voicing concerns as to how this process is evolving are quickly accused of fear-mongering or they’re lumped together with crazy conservative people who want this drug to be criminalized.

It is being predicted that there will be a $5 to $6 billion cannabis market and taxes collected here in California might even surpass $1 billion in the first year. It will be the biggest legal pot market in the nation.  The legalization of pot is being sold as a cash cow to many municipalities.  There are concerns that the vast majority of these dispensaries will be opening in communities where the majority of people are African-Americans and Latinos.  These people fret seeing pot shops in shopping centers or at every other street corner.

Furthermore, those in the industry are working hard to realign the image of marijuana.  They want “Cannabis” as the term to be used when referencing to marijuana. They  want smokers to stop using “pot,” “grass,” “blunt,” “weed,” and “dope.” Since these terms are associated with the stigma of being stupid, with laziness and that those who smoke it are just puffing their productive lives away.

Many cities in California are working around the clock to meet the high demand for permits for those who want to open dispensaries.  All these cities want a piece of the pie.  They are also making claims that legal dispensaries will not only root out black markets from their cities but also the new revenue will be used to improve the quality of life of people living in these cities.  It is not clear how black markets will disappear if prices for legalized marijuana at dispensaries are ridiculously high. Indeed, high taxes both from the state and the cities might make it more complicated for the legalization to take root.  Those who buy marijuana will have to pay taxes anywhere from 22% to 25% that will include state excise tax of 15%.  Those who grow and those who sell the plant will also have to pay taxes. Unable to pay these high prices many who smoke pot recreationally might have to go back to the black market.

In our very own city of Los Angeles, civic leaders will be using some sort of “social equity” as guidelines in deciding who will be licensed first with these pot dispensaries.  That is, those who were adversely affected by the “war on drugs” will be the first ones to get these licenses.  If one’s life was destroyed by being charged with for either smoking or selling marijuana, this individual will be given priority over all others.  It is sort of a wealth distribution mechanism being used by leaders in this city.  It is still somewhat unclear as to how this process will work.

Let’s review some history about the criminalization of marijuana, it should have never been criminalized.  Tragically, marijuana was likened to heroin and both were criminalized heavily.  The “War on Drugs” was irrational and immoral.  It was tragic how many people’s lives were utterly destroyed. This “War on Drugs” started in the Nixon Administration and continued well into the 1980s and 1990s. Voters who identified with the “public safety” mantra relentlessly lobbied Congress for tough policies for those who used drugs.  This “War on Drugs” policies were not only mean-spirited and short-sighted but they also disproportionately affected people of color.  It was Nixon the one who dubbed drug abuse “public enemy number one” in 1971.

Many people in the state are still puzzled after hearing recent reports that the Trump Administration through his Attorney General, Jeff Sessions might be targeting California.  The Attorney General is telegraphing that he might disrupt the operation of the cannabis industry that has been booming in the state. How can that be, they ask? We, the people, in the state of California, exercised our democratic rights and voted so we can legally buy pot for recreation and medical purposes. The federal government still designates marijuana as a “Schedule 1” drug.  Placing it here means that the drug is still considered extremely dangerous as heroin is and it repudiates claims that the drug helps sick individuals seeking medical benefits.  It is worth noting that according to these designations, cocaine is less harmful than Marijuana. Since cocaine is on Schedule 2. For some progressive states, this flew in the face of common sense.

As the usage of marijuana became democratized many Americans started supporting the movement for legalizing it.  A recent Gallup poll showed that “over 60% of voters supported legalization nationwide and among the law-and-order-Republican, the percentage is 51%. ”  The profound lack of action from Congress in decriminalizing marijuana forced states to act hoping that eventually, Congress will react. Many states have started taking action, through their initiative process,  for the decriminalization of this drug. It is argued that these actions will eventually force the federal government to finally take action.

No one wants to go back and see marijuana being criminalized, It is great that marijuana is being legalized in many states and it is hoped that Congress takes action soon so a better-uniformed process can be implemented nationwide.  Although many questions still remain unanswered about all this pot legalization. High taxes might not make the black markets vanished, people are still being educated as to where they can light up, and whether or not they can drive high.

As the feds are scrapping all the accommodations the Obama Administration provided for this legalization to flourish. Most banks will not allow those running dispensaries to open bank accounts.   This means that most transactions will be in cash hence bundles of cash and pounds of pots will be laying around at shops and warehouses. That should be a source of concern for those of us who care for communities of color.

Thank you for reading

Chamba Sanchez
1/21/2018

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Sources consulted

Aiello, Chloe.Jeff Sessions just made it even harder for California’s legal marijuana businesses to find a place to put their cash.” CNBC 10 Jan. 2018. Web. 14 Jan. 2018.

Gerber, Marisa.  “A new future for pot begins.” Los Angeles Times 2nd Jan. 2018. Web. 9 Jan. 2018.

Lee, Kurtis. “Next up in pot debate:  Public use.”  Los Angeles Times 13 Jan. 2018. Web. 14 Jan. 2018.

Ludwig, Mike. “What Jeff Sessions’ Latest Attack Means for the Future of Legal Marijuana.” Truthout 8 Jan. 2018. Web. 11 Jan. 2018

Smith, Aaron.  ‘California to tax pot as much as 45%.” CCN Money 31 Oct. 2018. Web. 10th Jan. 2018.

Rahmani, Neama. “Get real about security at marijuana dispensaries.” The Sun 27 Dec. 2017. Web. 23 Jan. 2018.

Robbins. Gary.  “Weeding out the slang pot terms.” Los Angeles Times 21 Jan. 2018. Web. 22 Jan. 2018

If you smoke click on this link below for some responses to basic questions you might have.
Masunaga, Samantha.  “Recreational marijuana is legal in California but you still can’t smoke it at work or in your car.” Los Angeles Times 4 Jan. 2018. Web. 18 Jan. 2018. 

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Photo Credit: Image used in this piece was purchased from Bigstock.

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39 Comments

  1. Lessly Ramirez January 24, 2018 at 1:53 am

    Can weed actually lead us to the Promise Land? That is a controversial topic. Can marijuana help improve our society? Yes, it’s true, marijuana has become another form of medical treatment, but smoking for the fun of it and doing it whenever cannot possible be a good thing. It is true, many people see marijuana as a breakthrough in the science and medical field, but others see it as a waste of time and money. Marijuana tends to cause laziness, hunger, panic, hallucinations, short-term memory loss, which many believe leads them to become low-lives and bums. Most people may think it is bad because it’s against the law and smoking the stuff has been associated with criminal behavior for a very long time, especially in religions and some cultures. However, I understand that in some processed form the plant has medicinal properties, but not in the sense where healthy people would smoke it to get a high. In addition, smoking marijuana does bring about an altered mind-set (unpredictable actually) in the person and to my way of thinking that may be the biggest reason why people in general think it is bad to smoke it. However, my lack of experience in this regard makes me not to hold a strong viewpoint either way. Most people are not convinced that smoking it for recreational purposes, that it can be good for one’s health and their health conditions; like Parkinson’s disease, seizure disorders, muscle spasms. Although this is a drug, many who use it get addicted and it can cause other health problems. What I DO know is that any addiction cannot be good for you.
    From my point of view, it doesn’t matter if the legalization of marijuana expands even more to other cities in the state, as long as these new dispensaries follow all the laws, policies, and regulations appointed. For example, how they cannot be near a school or recreational areas, and children. In order for this to work there has to be clear guidelines that must always be followed to ensure the safety of the public. Expanding the legalization of marijuana changes the game and route for many small town dealers and sellers. For some it can decrease their business, but for others it can increase their negotiations and business deals. Due to the fact of the high taxes that will implied when the new dispensaries are open to the public. Also, many of the council members discussing on the laws to be implemented. For example, when someone wants to driving while be high. Marijuana is an ongoing debate on becoming a public policy. In reality, both sides will never agree on one thing. All we can do is wait to see what happens next.

    Reply
  2. LaShanna Anderson January 24, 2018 at 3:52 am

    This article was an overall eye opener. I was not aware that medical marijuana became legal in the state of California in 1996. My concern is the multiple dispensaries in the inner city rapidly increasing. They are more dispensaries than liquor stores down Broadway. I live directly across the street from one. On my way to school at 8 in the morning sometimes earlier I see people casually walking in and out of the dispensaries, so I know they are making a nice amount in a few hours. Based upon the newfound business coming into L.A why is there not much benefit to the economy? Why are the taxes and rent still high ? It’s obviously beneficial for the cannabis smokers, but not the overall economy. Councilman Price said that the dispensaries who are opened illegally will get fined. My thing is if it is already legal to have marijuana in possession. Why can’t we just take a chunk out of each dispensary and place the money in needed areas. Such as rent control, schools, libraries, neighbors overall things that can make a stronger foundation in Los Angeles alone.

    Reply
  3. Veronica Almontes January 24, 2018 at 5:41 am

    The legalization of marijuana in some states remains a controversial issue, and there continues to be a lot of debate about whether or not marijuana is harmful to one’s health. A lot of people think that it’s not worth it, that we should be thinking about legalizing other things. And others are saying that it took long enough to get legalized. In my opinion, there will always be two sides to every story. From my experience, all the so called “pot heads” that I know are always complaining about the legalization of marijuana. Simply because now, they are being charged taxes for buying weed, or another example is the news about driving high. Before marijuana was legalized, they were okay driving around under the influence of marijuana, but now police will be in the hunt for slow driving cars, etc. For consumers, an open market, produces more competition. Which means lower prices and way more better customer service. For the government an open market rises the opportunities for an illegal market to flourish, making regulatory policies, such as age-limits on purchases, less effective. I remember on our field trip to City Hall, my council member Curren Price, mentioned the fact that out of 10,000 stores in the state, only about two marijuana dispensaries are legally registered. The fact that I see a dispensary in every corner of my neighborhood scares me, because I have a baby, who is growing up in this community and a little brother that is always asking questions. We already live in a community that you have to constantly watch your back every time you’re walking in the street. I now imagine how much worse it is going to get, with all the loitering going around, I mean for gods sake I have a dispensary right next door to the building where I live. The smell is really strong sometimes, and its a regularly thing. I don’t have anything against marijuana users, but when it comes to a dispensary opening up so close to home I start having problems.

    Reply
  4. WINISHA GRIFFIN January 24, 2018 at 6:03 am

    In all honesty I do not think marijuana can take the people to the promise land I do believe that it can
    take the state government to the Promised Land because they are the ones making a huge profit off of
    it. Although the people can make money off the marijuana business but thy will also be taxed and they
    will not make as much as the government. I think that it is wrong for the government to make money off
    of marijuana because majority of the people of color have been to jail for it and they are still locked up
    for it now it is legal, how disrespectful? I myself is a victim of possession of marijuana and I got arrested
    for the half of gram that I had. As I was being processed they put me in the new paper and made it seem
    like I was a criminal.
    Marijuana is the better version a prescribed medication. According to drugabuse.gov 160,000 people
    died from prescribe medication just in one year and no one has died from marijuana. So in some ways I
    do believe marijuana is a beneficial herb but I think it can bad as well. It is beneficial because it can help
    people who suffers from chronic pain, depression and/ or anxiety. Another reason why it is good
    because we can supplement prescribed drugs with marijuana. Not only do it come in a smoking form but
    it can also come as liquid, candy, pastries, and even butter. Even though it comes in all those different
    forms and some are not visible or noticeable u are not allowed and drive and use it or you cannot use it
    in public areas. I do not agree with marijuana being on every block in urban communities because it is
    dumbing our pope down. A lot of people cannot function off it, they can’t pass a drug test for a job or
    can’t pass a test. It is as many people addicted to marijuana in my neighborhood as there are
    dispensaries and that has to change.

    Reply
  5. Ricardo Colin January 24, 2018 at 7:44 am

    What I read from this article was really surprising. I was not aware that medical marijuana became legal in the state of California in 1996. The legalization of marijuana in some states are still a big issue today and there continues to be a lot of debate about whether or not marijuana is harmful to one’s health. I believe there is more important things in our community we should focusing on. Before marijuana was legalized, they were okay driving around under the influence of marijuana, but now police will be in the hunt for slow driving cars, etc. For consumers, an open market, produces more competition. Which means lower prices and way more better customer service. For the government, an open market rises the opportunities for an illegal market to flourish, making regulatory policies, such as age-limits on purchases, less effective. Marijuana is the better version a prescribed medication. So in some ways I do believe marijuana is a beneficial herb but I think it can bad as well. It is beneficial because it can help people who suffers from chronic pain, depression and/ or anxiety. Another reason why it is good because we can supplement prescribed drugs with marijuana. Not only do it come in a smoking form but it can also come as liquid, candy, pastries, and even butter. Its difficult to tell if marijuana can take us to a promise land but I do think it can be good thing for our society it can be another form of medical treatment, but smoking for the fun of it and doing it whenever cannot possible be a good thing. It is true, many people see marijuana as a breakthrough in the science and medical field, but others see it as a waste of time and money. Marijuana tends to cause laziness, hunger, panic, hallucinations, short-term memory loss, which many believe leads them to become low-lives and bums. Most people may think it is bad because it’s against the law and smoking the stuff has been associated with criminal behavior for a very long time, especially in religions and some cultures. However, I understand that in some processed form the plant has medicinal properties, but not in the sense where healthy people would smoke it to get a high.

    Reply
  6. silvia aceves January 24, 2018 at 10:19 am

    I believe that marijuana can help better our society when it comes to medical purposes. Marijuana is an herb that is used as a medical treatment, but there are individuals that choose to abuse its purpose. Marijuana should be used properly and not for experimental use with out medical purpose. What I mean is, that people especially younger adults should stop consuming marijuana for fun, or to get high for the purpose of drug abuse. Many people who don’t need medical marijuana tend to get side effects like “the munchies” or they become lazy and it can impair their judgement. I am actually happy to hear about the legalization but only for medical purposes and not for drug abuse. I think that they shouldn’t give out medical licenses without a proper medical prove. If the legalization of marijuana does expand, they should make sure that the dispensaries follow all the proper policies and regulations. For example, there is a lot of dispensaries that no longer ask for recommendations, and as long as the individual is 21 with a valid ID they allow them to purchase. Also, there is literally more dispensaries than schools, all levels combined. I don’t see the point to walk a couple of blocks down and see so many dispensaries. For the placement, I believe that they should have them removed form areas near schools and recreational areas like parks, museums, near shopping centers and so on. In order for this to follow through the regulations need to become more strict and must be followed accordingly to guarantee the public’s safety. This might decrease the small businesses and especially the “self employed” dealers, but it will benefit the economy greatly because all the dispensaries will follow regulations and pay taxes unlike the other businesses that are doing unlawful sales.

    Reply
  7. Byron Miller January 24, 2018 at 11:41 am

    It is funny how marijuana has become a new thing all of a sudden. Marijuana in the 1960’s was looked at as recreational back then only to be consumed at parties, festivals, or galas of some sort. Marijuana was used for its calming effect it has on the majority of the people who consume it. People over the centuries have used marijuana for various uses…. In the medieval times, it was used to help ease menstrual cycle pains, and some during pregnancy. In this day and age, people tend to see marijuana as a party and get high as hell type of drug once completely consumed. Our very own military who protects this great nation during Vietnam, a majority of the enlisted returned back home addicted to various other drugs besides marijuana. Morphine, heroin, barbiturates, all played a more destruction part of society once the veterans returned home. Nowadays the same drug they said was irrelevant and deemed unhealthy is now being administered to veterans and others who suffered at the hands of some sort of PTSD. Hypocritical? Or as how some has viewed it as having a purpose of some sort. This plant has been in existence what seems like forever and based on what the people want is now being viewed and seen as harmful? I have never read about an individual involved in the killing of the masses, or jumping in a car and mowing down innocent victims on a sidewalk, or involved in a bombing of some sort. The sheer comparison of weed to the likes of heroin, cocaine, oxycontin, PCP, is utterly absurd and those who devise this to be so should be ashamed of the blatant fallacies being exemplified.
    At this point, the Gov’t is pissed that the people feel this is ridiculous to punish the said public for their vote to legalize marijuana. There is great revenue involved in this process of accepting recreational marijuana but it takes away from the medical marijuana industry that actually provides patients with health care and a much more simpler and practical solution. What has people up in arms is how marijuana is perceived. Stigmas associated with marijuana are: It makes you lazy, paranoia, alters your mental state. As if Tylenol with codeine, Vicodin, or valiums, doesn’t impair your ability to remain focused. Weed, pot, or marijuana can not have the same negative connotation as the other aforementioned. No one discusses that marijuana has saved numerous lives since doctors started treating adults and children for rare conditions to where medical marijuana has prevailed and surpassed modern medical treatments.
    I think I would much rather be in the presence of a recreational smoker opposed to being around a person high on PCP, or the likes of heroin. I have never read about teens, or adult smoking a joint and killing up to a entire movie theater, or murdering elementary students, or bombing a marathon. Negative connotations will always be at the forefront especially for individuals who do not partake in the consumption of marijuana. In such a capitalistic society money will always be the most focused on, not the health of the public, concern for those in need will go continuously unheard if all the wrong reasons are placed ahead of what’s important. We all knew this industry would produce income through the roof but what people of the gov’t didn’t expect were for the people to support something that was looked at as something low life people or people who came from low-income families and social structure. What’s hypocritical is the same individuals lobbying against recreational marijuana may have used it themselves before becoming a responsible adult later in life. If you wanna smoke weed, drink it, dab it, or eat it, as long as it is within consumption parameters (packaging contents-labeling) and the individual is in a setting that regulates it’s use or even in the comfort of your own home and not harming anyone, then the opponents should take a very good look at WHAT THE PEOPLE WANT and voted on.

    Reply
  8. james gooden January 24, 2018 at 4:55 pm

    Just recently California began allowing the legal sales of marijuana for recreational use. According to state estimates, more than 400 businesses were licensed. With that, the most populous state and the world’s sixth-largest economy officially launched an entirely new legal industry within its borders. Even though recreational use is now legal, you can’t smoke it in public, or within 1,000 feet of a school or daycare center when children are present. You also can’t smoke and drive. Local governments have the authority to make their own rules governing use, which will cause further confusion.

    Reply
  9. Elizabeth Sanchez January 24, 2018 at 11:46 pm

    The first thing that came to my mind when Marijuana was legalized here in California, was “no more black markets”. In my head that was a good way this legalization would help my community. We wouldn’t see so many drug dealers around the corner, trying to sell pot to our kids. Then I found out about the high taxes on Marijuana when bought in dispensaries, it was a slap in the face. There is no way people will want to pay the extra 22% to 25% in taxes. They will go back to their “connects” or dealers to get the weed without being charged extra like in the dispensaries, and they can get more weed with their dealers.
    I don’t like the idea of having too many dispensaries in the Black and Latino communities. It can send a message about who we are as persons. Other communities can use that to label everyone as potheads and maybe even dangerous due to the danger of weed. I have nothing against people who smoke Marijuana for medical purposes or just to get high, but in my point of view, society already think of us Black and Latino communities as drug dealers, lazy people and dangerous human beings. Having too many dispensaries sort of proves them right in a way, and I believe we should prove them wrong about what they think of us. We can be successful and hard working people just like anyone else. We don’t need Marijuana dispensaries, we need more grocery stores, more libraries and more recreational centers to make our communities a better place.

    Reply
  10. Maria Flores January 25, 2018 at 12:05 am

    Since I can remember, marijuana has been a very controversial topic for myself. I come from a family in which marijuana was always a subject that would create arguments. Even though marijuana has been so popular in all the places where I have lived, it has never been part of my “world.” Neither of my parents nor close members of my family smoke it. The first time I was introduced to it was at a concert I attended with my parents. I was only twelve or thirteenth years old, and my mom said this to me: “Do you smell that ‘funny’ smoke? Well, that is marijuana, and I want you to remember that smell. So, if someone ever offers you some, you know you always have to say NO.” And I remembered it forever.

    I am 39 years old, and all my life, I have heard so many stories related to marijuana. However, the truth is this: I still do not know too much about it. The ones who are regular smokers support the legalization of the plant. Most of the ones who do not smoke it, do not really care that much about it. Also, the ones who do not smoke it, but think that such plant could bring some benefits to our society, agree with the legalization of it. Honestly speaking, we, the people, have allowed other laws to exist and be “legal” around us that are as much as dangerous as marijuana or ever worse. And even when we are aware about all the causing damages all these “legal” laws produce, we just cross our arms and do nothing about it. We let people to smoke “regular” and “legal” cigarettes around us, around our children, around pregnant women, and elderly people. Cigarette’s smoke is harmful to our health; even when we are not the ones who are smoking them, but we smell them. Our society also allows permits for alcohol and people consume it at any time and everywhere. Accidents, deaths, diseases, and so many social and family tragedies related to alcohol have been existing for years, and we just see it as “normal” and “acceptable.”
    We have to learn and understand that not because something it is “legal”, it means it is “good”. Junk and unhealthy food is sold and found everywhere and in any levels of communities. Many official government and health department institutions approve and allow millions of junk food companies like Coca Cola, McDonald’s, Burger King, and Taco Bell to advertise, promote, sell, and distribute their poisoned products all around the world; thus, they are create empires of unhealthy people from at very young ages and no ones says anything at all.
    Many of us complain about Marijuana’s effect on young individuals pertain to lazy and lethargic qualities. Essentially, marijuana makes people stupid with regards to decision making such as causing harm in their health. We also accept superficiality, stupidity and violence promoted and accepted on T.V. in general and the movies industry. We are facing a tremendous level of young and undesired pregnancies in this era in which all anti-pregnancy methods exist, etc., etc., etc.
    Come on, let’s be honest with ourselves, there are many other social and civil issues we have to face that are braking our societies apart and nobody cares about!. I do no like marijuana because it makes sets society back., leaving no room to progress. For instance, in the seventh teen countries that I have visited while I was doing humanitarian work, most of them–including The Netherlands in which marijuana has been legal already legal for so many years–I have never seen or witnessed a great society thanks of the marijuana effects on humans. Meaning, nations that allow marijuana to integrate with the norms of society hardly contributes to the world. In essence, the nation is stagnate. Though some nations are prosperous even with marijuana recent legalization, the wealth of said nation can be obtain through alternative means, opposed to gaining wealth via global contributions.

    Lastly, I have never visited a hospital, medical clinic, health or even educational institution in which its patients or academics get better or are able to perform their jobs in a better way thanks to marijuana consumption. I personally tried it a couple of times. I felt relaxed, yes. But I felt stupid as well. I could not even remember well all what I had done under the influence of it. Then, I realized it that to be able to perform my duties as a good student, worker, daughter, sister, and ballet dancer, which I try to be, I would not like to feel and act like stupid never again.

    Thank you for reading.

    Reply
  11. Victor Pearson January 25, 2018 at 12:41 am

    I think that legal marijuana use can be accomplished in this country. It’s my opinion from the current knowledge information available medical marijuana has some very good practical use.
    Criminalizing marijuana is a complicated issue also. It causes people to seek it out just because its a taboo and people like doing things they shouldn’t but the issue is law enforcement disproportionately attack low income and minority demographics. The so called “War on Drugs” destroys more lives than it saves and has been proven not to work.
    In short I think that there needs to be a more lengthy well thought out discussion and execution of the results of that discussion to implement a legal practice of marijuana use. It will not be an easy task because there are so many pros and cons to marijuana use that affects so many people. I for one don’t want to be the victim of excessive and abusive “legal” use of marijuana and subjected to day in and day out. People are just too disrespectful to one another to be walking around “high” whether it is legal or not. The so called legal use of it should strictly be done at home.

    Reply
  12. Ariana Hall January 25, 2018 at 2:31 am

    I don’t believe that it was smart to legalize marijuana. I believe the government should have just made a law that allows people to hold a certain amount of marijuana without being locked up for it. The government will heavily tax the market because of how popular it has become. For example, if people haven’t noticed the price for any tobacco has increase. That includes Backwoods, Swishers, and Dutchees. Also they government will place limitations on the potency of certain product like edibles. Meaning people will have to purchase more for achieve the high they would of had before the legalization. A lot of shops will have to re locate because like Councilman Price said a medical shop can be with a certain amount of feet from a school or church. Which I don’t understand because there is a liquor store on every corner in LA. If the council is going to making decision like that I believe they should do it across the board when it comes to anything that impairs you being.

    Reply
  13. Giselle Castor January 25, 2018 at 5:45 am

    Growing up I always heard that marijuana was the worse thing I could ever try. My mother and teachers always told me that marijuana was the gateway drug to cocaine and heroin. These remarks were made by older individuals, and after reading this article I realize where their negative perceptions of marijuana stemmed from. As stated in the article marijuana was criminalized during the Nixon Administration, and later in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, I think the perception of marijuana has changed. As I have learned more about marijuana I have found that my thoughts on it don’t reflect those of my parents. I do not think that marijuana is a bad thing, and I feel that many people think this as well. It no longer holds the negative stigma it once did, and this can be seen through the legalization of it.

    When I heard that marijuana become legalized in California I thought it was a good thing because I felt that it reflected a new progressive way of thinking. I thought that this decision was as simple as letting individuals smoke marijuana, but after reading this article I realized that there are many complex and underlying issues behind it. The legalization of marijuana solved one problem, but it also opened the door for more pending questions. Many of the problems that result from Proposition 64 affect lower-income communities. My community is composed of lower-income families of color, and I can see that dispensaries are more common within these types of communities. I am not against marijuana, but I don’t think that a dispensary in every corner is a good thing. I don’t think that a wealthy community would allow this, and I find it unfair that my type of communities are targeted. This problem is just one of the many that is not addressed by Proposition 64.

    I think that the legalization of marijuana will have a positive impact on our economy. In the article it states that California can expect $5 to $6 billion taxes collected, but where another problem arises is in the taxes imposed on sellers. The taxes imposed on sellers are very high, and this leads to many relying back to the black market. I always thought that once marijuana became legal there would be a decrease in the black market, but instead the opposite is occurring. I feel like this defies the purpose of Proposition 64, and in a way it makes it ineffective. This is just another problem affecting lower-income communities because black market dispensaries are more likely to operate within them. Even if sellers agree to these taxes they are still not allowed to open their own bank accounts. This leaves many dispensaries to store their money in a warehouse or inside their facility. These dispensaries make a good amount of money, and knowing that their money may be stored within can cause robberies and violence. I was unaware that many dispensaries are not allowed to create bank accounts, and it worries me that there will be an increase of violence because there are people willing to rob this money.

    I’m glad that people were progressive enough to legalize marijuana, but I feel like many of us underestimated the complex issues that would arise from it. I think that legalization of marijuana can bring many positive things, but in order for it to be fully efficient the government must do something to fix the underlying problems. It doesn’t help much that the federal government continues to believe that marijuana is the biggest threat next to heroin and cocaine. I think that we still have a long way to go, and the legalization of marijuana is only the first step.

    Reply
  14. Gus January 25, 2018 at 6:42 am

    Interesting viewpoint on marijuana. The arguments I have heard against it involve the dispensaries not appropriately paying their taxes since it will be through cash and the book keeping can be manipulated. another has involved weed becoming an increasing distraction to the youth. I believe the former holds a larger merit.

    The legalization of marijuana will solve an issue that has impacted our community for a long time now. At this point we know that it is not as bad as heroin, cocaine, or crystal meth, but it is still marked as a schedule one drug. This has placed many in our jail system. Which, for any concerned about the negative economic effects of legalizing marijuana, should seem counter intuitive. It takes tens of thousands of dollars to keep someone in jail for a year. Why put them away because of a drug that is so close to not destructive.

    Regarding the point of how it will affect society, we definitely know that it cannot be worse than alcohol. Alcohol has been proven to cause more harm than marijuana, yet one of those two has been legal for years, while the other gets you a visit to jail if you consume it. Not everyone will begin to smoke marijuana once it is easily accessible. Like the beer commercials on television say, “drink responsibly”. I am certain that people can control their marijuana intake. If the estimates of how much the legal sale of marijuana are even half true, we can expect much more tax revenue for the state, which can go directly to funding schools.

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  15. Andrea Renteria January 25, 2018 at 6:48 am

    I will forever be against the legalization of marijuana . My views on this subject are that there are not many benefits to it. I feel that it is very unlikely to even be able to reach such a higher status quote as a society with weed being so available. what i don’t understand is that if the government wants to legalize marijuana , why not legalize it to the point where it is as simple as buying cigarettes? why should we be going through these steps.
    Marijuana has is good for medical use and should be used as a natural healing supplement of even have its oil extracted to create better medicines , but really? For recreational purposes. This is another tactic to stabilize these weed shops in the ghetto, bring to the attention of our children and slow us down as a community. The government has officially implanted drugs in our community and have gotten away with it in the most legal way possible. Plus they are making financial gain from it . Comes to show once an industry is prospering even the government can get as corrupt as classifying a drug.

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  16. Ryle Pangilinan January 25, 2018 at 7:18 am

    Proposition 64 or also known as Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) to legalize the possession, cultivation, and the sale of marijuana of individuals over the age of 21. The usage of non-medical marijuana as a business would be regulated by the state, that means imposing taxes on the product and the revenue would go towards youth programs, environmental protection, and the law enforcement. Considering that “It is being predicted that there will be a $5 to $6 billion cannabis market and taxes collected here in California” (Will weed…) it may just be a prediction nevertheless but its close enough to tell us of the expected earning from putting a tariff on marijuana business. Considering there are Marijuana shops in every block surely the government will benefit hugely when it comes to the consumer market of cannabis in California.
    All seems like a great idea until one question arises, are impaired drivers, under the influence of marijuana, would they be prosecuted? There hasn’t been an incident of a car accident or mass shooting that involved the contributors smoking pot beforehand. Unlike Alcohol, in 2015 there were 10,265 people that died due to alcohol impaired driving. The government manages to tax Alcohol and Tobacco use and they can just add marijuana into the list.
    All throughout my High School years, marijuana was the big talk every single person was curious of the herb, devil’s lettuce as someone would refer to it. As I interreacted with more people I had the pleasure of knowing what it felt to be high. My first puff took me to a dream like domain, it felt great. There is a social stigma against marijuana as a whole: it can make you lazy (somewhat true), paranoid, perceived health problems, and change your state of mind. I did at some point experience all the stigmas, I was much lazier whether it was because of weed, I do not know. We would be in a group getting high and every time one of us would hear a siren we would all somewhat panic. And finally, I have noticed my reaction time has gone down significantly and that’s when I’m under the influence. I feel like nowadays teens specially are getting on board to be “cool” its more of some bragging rights with constant posting to share with friends as a form of affirmation. Cannabis would never take us to the promise land because progress would decline since more than half of the population would be relaxing at the comfort of their own home getting high.

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  17. Jennifer M. January 25, 2018 at 7:53 am

    But mostly  the legalizing marijuana in medical form can reach out to the patients who will benefit from this. Drug consumption that causes problems for the user, can be solved byoffering the consumer accurate information about the drug being consumed & the possible health consequences and access to professionals that can be approach for help.Drug consumption can cause problems for the rest of society the most effective way to hand it as it pertains to the actual harm caused. Drug consumption does not excuse a person from the consequences from their actions or their failings while under the influence of a drug.

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  18. Edwin January 25, 2018 at 7:59 am

    The legalization of marijuana in some states have become an issue, while to others it has become influential on behalf of their health and to their satisfaction. Many people believe that marijuana shouldn’t be worth legalizing, as supposed to legalizing something that’ll befit our society. Legalizing marijuana is just the same as buying off the counter medicine. In my perspective, I haven’t been influenced by marijuana in my life. I have been exposed to it by acquaintances. It has two sides to it in my perspective. Some patients might be prescripted marijuana to treat their needs, while others use it for the satisfaction of the feeling it gives you. I don’t see what the problem with charging high tax when purchasing marijuana. If people don’t like getting charged, just quit smoking and move along, instead of complaining. Lately there’s been signs on the freeways stating that driving high is like drunk driving. There’s danger to marijuana especially for those first time smokers. There are so many dispensaries and so many connections that even young teenagers are exposed to the business of dispensaries. Some liquor stores don’t even require for you to show your ID when you purchase alcohol. There are many ups and downs to legalization but we can only control so much as an individual. According to this blog “ It became the first state in the country to legalize medical marijuana in 1996.” Marijuana became legal in this country, a lot earlier. This isn’t nothing new.

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  19. Ivana R. January 25, 2018 at 10:04 pm

    Growing up in the city of Los Angeles has always meant that you’ll be around different issues. One of the most common ones has been the usage of marijuana, whether it is truly beneficial or whether it was a problem for the consumers. I personally believe that marijuana will always harm not physically but mentally and I am against it. There aren’t many true and liable facts that state that marijuana has cured someone permanently, its always been a short term remedy. Marijuana short term remedies are usually when people use it as a healing supplement like those with arthritis. The use of it to helps with the pain but it isn’t permanent and they have to continuously use it. The use of marijuana was the beginning of the long term addiction of one of my family members, it didn’t do anything but make him want something stronger and that then led to the use of other drugs. For that reason I believe people have to really considerate the consequences and think twice before using it.
    As to the issue with the black markets, in my viewpoint they will never vanish because the prices and “deals” will always be better. Therefore, the tax revenue that the state of California thinks it will make of it is total nonsense. They might be able to make some money at the beginning because if people really want to continue with their business they’ll go through with the whole process and get all the paperwork, licenses in order no matter the cost. But as time passes that tax percentage will increase and some will have no choice but to shutdown and the black markets will always be around. And at the end of the day the whole issue affects our community, because as of now almost every corner has a dispensary. The ones that live in those communities are the Blacks and Latinos, so who gets labeled as “pot heads” and “low-lifes” we do. There needs to be a limit, especially because in every other corner we have schools located around and the ones being harmed are the children. Many find it easy to try it and end up hooked on it, instead of avoiding the temptation, it is merely rubbed in our faces.

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  20. Jared Williams March 2, 2018 at 5:43 pm

    Governor Brown’s comment I believe it rings true in some respect, but if everyone was drinking beer, we couldn’t have a civil society. I think the implications of that statement is continuing a stigma that’s associated with pot /cannabis. It is sustained by making a false equivalency of what one might think of as more dangerous. No one truly believes everybody should be smoking pot all the time. Just like nobody truly believes that everyone should be drinking beer all the time. It’s an irritating statement on a lot of levels. As we were talking about social or criminal justice issues, I think it’s important to talk about communities that have been affected by the ridiculous war on drugs. Over policing racial profiling and disproportionate sentencing. California law in some instances has allowed people with prior marijuana possession Convictions to have those overturned or at least re-examined. I think the issue of impairment is a tougher one to Define just because the science is a little shaky on what defines impairment. It goes into detail about nanograms and all sorts of random science that has yet been defied. I support the changing of the terminology from marijuana to cannabis. Cannabis was its original name marijuana was a name that was given to it to make it sound more foreign therefore allowing drug enforcement officers to say things like this.“There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the U.S., and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others.” “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.”Federal Bureau of Narcotics, a predecessor to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Harry Anslinger 1930s. (Yep he racist) As far as the federal government is concerned, I find it real shaky ground when Jefferson Beauregard Sessions has defended states rights when it suits his needs and now is going to try to push to make decisions about what a state has the right to define what it can do when comes to commerce. I find it to be pretty rich.I believe this law will evolve with more voices being heard and improve.
    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/01/14/marijuana-prohibition-racist_n_4590190.html

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  21. Liz Reyes March 2, 2018 at 5:52 pm

    Will weed takes us to the Promised Land?
    The topic of marijuana has been a controversial topic throughout history. What was astounding to find out is that in article, it mentions that marijuana has actually be legalized since 1996. There has been dispute about the proper use of it. But honestly, for me the use of consumption of marijuana and the legalization of marijuana is a crimalize action. So no, weed will not take you to the Promised Land.
    Although argued that marijuana has “medical benefits”, the damage is more than the benefits. People get high on marijuana, and the people who abuse on the consumption of it have poor judgment. The articles mentions how it can be a risk to public safety as well. That marijuana can impair someone. And to buy marijuana is expensive as well. That the taxes of that product can be costly.
    By my area, in a corner a few blocks from where I live the had open a marijuana shop. And recently next to it they opened a shop where they sell the pipes to smoke it. A few block of the other direction they open another smoke shop. You see more each day that people are spending their money in marijuana, than they are in anything else.
    Marijuana can be seen as a drug to many people. I see it as drug that is slowly destroying the lives of innocent people, who actually don’t see the problem. Honestly i strongly think it shouldn’t be legalized.

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  22. Eshan Harith March 2, 2018 at 9:32 pm

    I think weed will never take people to any land. This subject always being talked about all over the media. specially whether it should be legalized or not. Some people think it should be, others think it shouldn’t, and some think it should be with some modifications on the usage. I’m with the people who thinks that it should be with some modification on the usage because there are way more positive things that could come out of it being legal than come out illegal. firstly, it would keep people away from drugs that are more harmful. Marijuana in many cases could be sold from dealers who also sell hard drugs. Therefore, if marijuana was legal and sold in a store in the correct way, it would help people to stay away from other drugs that dealers have to offer. Secondly, I read an article about weed, according to that Marijuana could be used to help with pain, nausea, and other symptoms that normal drugs just simply aren’t curing. Also, it could be a great way to allow people to relax themselves on a normal basis. The use of marijuana has always been questioned but now is the time our country is at a time where the usage of the drug is at a peak and the issue needs to be addressed. Therefore, I think it should be use with some modifications on the usage.

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  23. Dulce March 3, 2018 at 3:40 am

    Sadly, it is so true that many marijuana shops are being opened where minorities live. I am not against marijuana usage but I am against the fact that many people who use is abuse of it. Way before marijuana was legalized here I would see people smoking but although I am sure this was done before , I now see so many TEENAGERS smoking in the street with their friends. I would understand if they medically needed it but lets me realistic ! those kids were not smoking because they have glaucoma or something. We complain of how bad our kids and teenagers are skipping school, misbehaving and so much more. We are hurting their future by making it even easier now for them to obtain a substance they are abusing. Adults really need to take a minute and see how our teenagers are not progressing in school and are illiterates. I have seen how many teens can not even spell ! They are our future and instead of helping we hinder them and for what? to make others rich .

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  24. Brittney Rivera March 4, 2018 at 6:30 am

    I thought this article was very informative and definitely an eye opener. How can this topic cause a dispute for many years? Is Marijuana a necessity for our community or a want? Wanting something just because a person wants it is completely different than needing it. Let’s just take a moment and really analyze this topic. With all the money that each dispensary will be making, how much is really going to help our community? And are they really worth all the taxes being paid?
    What about the young kids in our generation!? I walk to work everyday and witness 15 year olds smoking with their buddies. I have coworkers that would rather smoke out with their friends than show up at a shift at work. I think as a community we should have our priorities straight. I honestly believe the bad outweighs the good when speaking about this issue. Marijuana won’t take us to the promise land.

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  25. Kassandra Sanchez March 4, 2018 at 4:59 pm

    I believe that the controversy over marijuana will be a never-ending discussion. Marijuana was legalized for medicinal purposes, but honestly many citizens voted pro-legalization because it is such a mainstream drug. There are so many people who use the drug and unfortunately there are many who abuse it. It could be that the government not only decided to legalize for tax revenue but to remove the black market. However, with the high taxes, these owners and buyers need to pay they will eventually fall back into the black market. Nevertheless, what the government needs to worry about is those who abuse the marijuana. They need to enforce new laws that will help keep it under control like drunk driving. I actually saw a commercial recently that says, “DUI doesn’t just mean boozed.” This is a campaign that aims towards marijuana and other prescription drugs used before or while driving. So I believe marijuana is not the issue people should be concerned about, but the people who use it.

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  26. Tareikia Janai Buller March 5, 2018 at 1:12 am

    This article is a really good eye opener and really addresses all of the concerns that come with the legalization of marijuana. I didn’t know that marijuana became “medical marijuana” all the way back in 1996 so that was a interesting factor to add into this blog. Which brings a question to mind and that is “since it has been such a long time that the legalization of marijuana has been an issue why have all the logistics and laws taken so long to be in place?” However my opinion and view of this is that if marijuana is going to be such a huge market then there should be a way to control the consumption of this product. If people are going to continue and use Marijuana for medical purposes then there should be more emphasis on the ways of consumption that will not get people “high” and will just contain whatever healing component it needs.In other words to make what im trying to say simpler I feel that there needs to be a way to seperate the drug from being a dangerous drug. I know that the controversy about marijuana will never be over ,and will forever be a topic of discussion with many different opinions and views.

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    1. Brenda March 6, 2018 at 5:07 am

      The legalization of drugs in general is a controversial topic no matter if it’s weed, heroin or any other drug.This topic will most likely always create controversy. I am not against the legalization of drugs nore for it basically because I know there is certain drugs that can help with certain diseases and with chronic pain. I basically think they should approved but with some restrictions and moderations because that way they will not be easy to get and not just anyone will get access to them. Doing drugs will not take us to no promise land.

      Reply
  27. Jeff March 5, 2018 at 4:29 am

    Noticing how California has been right, front and center trying to decriminalize marijuana for many years. Becoming the first state in the country to legalize medical marijuana in 1996. California will better mediate how the cannabis will marketed and regulated. Understanding how People voicing concerns are quickly accused of fear-mongering or they’re lumped together with crazy conservative people. it’s easier to be on the progressive side of the cannabis debate. Yet I personally still don’t believe how medical cannabis, is a deadly drug that could ruin lives. Like any drug theres risk of addiction, and death. Cannabis has proven to be non lethal, and have minor addictive properties.

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  28. Andrew Park March 5, 2018 at 6:32 am

    There are a lot of variables at play when it comes to Cannabis. Yes, there are still stigma attached to those who use cannabis as well as to those who support it, be we have realize that it was recreational before. And what baffles me now is the fame that this non-food plant gained so much media coverage now. Is it another government agenda to publicly and recreational(ly) make cannabis legal as ways and means to make and scrape taxes? Of course it could also be that cannabis is a less potent drug than heroin, cocaine, etc or it could simply mean that the times are truly changing. And although people are made to believe that recreational cannabis would bring about more numbers in use of cannabis, but that is not the case. Since making cannabis recreational only 20-25% of the population consume cannabis.

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  29. Melisa Ibarra March 5, 2018 at 7:01 am

    After reading this article I was very surprised. I did not know how much cannabis was being used nor talked about. I do however understand that there is good use for this substance and do think there should be very high requirements towards being able to use it because many people use it just for fun.
    But honestly making taxes that high will only make matters worse. People will still find a way to get it cheaper. I also heard that driving high is almost the safe as driving drunk. I’m not very whether its true or not but I guess that is a good topic to look into more about.

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  30. yarmil abrego March 5, 2018 at 7:29 am

    It does makes a difference that marijuana is not being criminalize like before, and people are now more free to use it in public. However taxation of marijuana should become more accessible to the people that want to use it so less black markets of marijuana are out there in the community not paying taxes that can help a community. The only things that I have been asking is how is law enforcement going to deal with the bigger use of marijuana, most of them believe that marijuana is the first drug that leads to other drugs, and it raises the question of would more crime is on the way for our communities. Now a days you hear other people saying that their doctor wants to prescribe marijuana for anxiety or migraines, and I have hear these people say no I do not like the side affects that it comes with using marijuana so maybe for recreational use is more popular with people then for medical purposes. Marijuana to me should be minimize and regulated so less people abuse of it.

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  31. LaVelle March 5, 2018 at 7:33 pm

    I like this article a lot, due to the fact that you stated;

    “The federal government still designates marijuana as a “Schedule 1” drug. Placing it here means that the drug is still considered extremely dangerous as heroin is and it repudiates claims that the drug helps sick individuals seeking medical benefits. It is worth noting that according to these designations, cocaine is less harmful than Marijuana. Since cocaine is on Schedule 2. For some progressive states, this flew in the face of common sense”.

    Cannabis has never been a problem, but those in position has tried convince the masses that this was a big problem to their community as well as the country in a whole. One day people of all ages, color, and belief would treat this like back years ago when alcohol was introduce. I hope that it’s not a way for the rich to get richer and Blacks, Latinos find themselves pushed out of the way even though Blacks and Latinos are the most to go to jail and serving time for having cannabis in their possession.

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  32. Ester March 5, 2018 at 7:34 pm

    I think that the legalization of cannabis is a big deal. Here is why, I think that now that this plant is being taxed is ridiculous . The government will find a way to feed of peoples money just how medical care works here in California. I think the government only let it happen because of the money income it will get, not because they really care about people consuming it the right way. This is not a “drug” but the way people are using it just messes it up for people who do use this in a medical way because this is a very powerful plant to heal or recover instead of those addicting pills doctors say will help. It is not fair for the people who are long time patients and now are being taxed because it is now legal and are forced to pay for taxes when the government doesn’t support this. This plant does have it’s history, and it is understandable why some may not support it, but the drugs from the drug store are what people should be worrying about. I’d say I disagree with this legalization, the farmers and the government are both trying to make money but then again its all about marketing in California, but only for the people in power have an outreach to economical substances and shark tank peoples ideas and jobs.

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  33. Ana Fonseca March 6, 2018 at 1:12 am

    Although not everyone supports the legalization of marijuana, I believe that this decision may have positive effects on our city. Like it has been mentioned above, allowing cannabis to be sold for recreational purposes will bring in heavily needed revenue which can be used to fix our street or similar tasks. Even those who do not smoke cannabis will be benefited, they should try to see the bigger picture. I, however, do not agree with the government’s sentiments regarding cannabis. How is it possible that they could rank cannabis as being more dangerous than cocaine. I can now see why their “war on drugs” has been so unsuccessful, they let their misconceptions get in the way.

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  34. Floyd D. Simmons Jr. March 6, 2018 at 1:13 am

    The thought probably never occurred about how the communities (Black and Latin) will continue to suffer.
    It seems to me, that when the downtrodden communities began to rise (Consciously), there are always a wrench thrown in the mix. In the 60s, it was the heroin, the 70s the pills (red devils, purple hayes, etc..) In the 80s, the crack epidemic which ruined many families (black as well as Latino). The only places I’ve noticed these Medical centers are in the black and Latin communities. Why is this a continuous process in our communities? We have enough crime with crack, the liquor stores and all other forms of ills. I wish I could make a strong stand and show the younger generation that they are headed way down and might never return. I would advise anyone if they’re into music to listen to Gill Scott Heron: The song titled “Angle Dust.” The message from the past.

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  35. Vanessa T March 6, 2018 at 4:45 am

    The legalization of Marijuana has helped the Black community tremendously… I personally know a lot of Black Males that have been prosecuted and charged for the possession of weed and have gotten time. For instant I know someone who was ticketed two years prior for the possession of Marijuana. I say not enough and to be charged with intent to sell . Enough for personal use, the ticket was DA reject two years prior they came to his mother house. Made a big ordeal and they arrested him said that the DA picked it back up and refiled an he went to jail. He bailed out but they were trying to give him time behind an old ticket and his prior history. He ended up getting probation and having to pay a fee. Four years later he went to court and by now it’s legal and he was in court still on probation for something that was legal now and the attorney and the judge was like everything dismissed case close sorry for the inconvenience which really was a waste of time and he wasn’t the only one there for Marijuana which was crazy. I say this to say that even if it’s legal or illegal they will still find a way and do what they want because of how you look and what your record looks like period. I’ve seen it go good and I’ve seen this go bad and I’ve seen it go good it all depends on the area and the person who’s in possession of the Marijuana, That’s my opinion.

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  36. Jose March 6, 2018 at 5:06 am

    Marijuana is a drug the same way morphine or any pain pill is a drug. i believe people have the choice to consume marijuana as an option for medical problems. The same way that when you take morphine or any pain pill its suggests you not to drive or operate machinery after a dosage, the same thing should go to when consuming marijuana. People should not drive or operate machinery while being “high”.
    Marijuana should be treated like alcohol. Alcohol is a drug and you obviously can not be walking down the street drinking a beer or any type of alcohol. Smoking marijuana should have the same law. We shouldnt be seeing everyone walking down the street smoking joints all the time. it should be consumed in your own private property.

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  37. Jose Rodriguez March 6, 2018 at 5:39 am

    The topic Of Marijuana or how people in the industry want to call it ” Cannabis” is a never ending topic. This article gave me an insight how marijuana now is more accessible to buy even if you have to pay a tax fee but its being more accessible to younger kids. I know people require to Marijuana as a medical remedy purpose to cure Glaucoma, control epileptic seizures , to decreasing anxiety , but in other hand theres another group of people who tend to overuse it more than there supposed to which causes them problems as well. The more the years pass the more I see marijuana dispensiries , open towards south central , downtown ,and more low class neighborhoods. The Government supposedly permitted the purchase of marijuana in the shop supposedly to put a stop from people to buying it from the black market but at the end of the day those who will not be able to pay those 20 to 25% taxes will end up going back to buying from the black market for a cheaper price.

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  38. Cristhian Ramos March 6, 2018 at 6:44 am

    After learning a few new things about marijuana, I still don’t really find any interest in it. If I ever do find interest it would be if it’s making money purposes. Those people who use it for it’s medical purpose, I’m all for that. I’m glad it’s doing something good. I feel the money it makes now that it’s legal has done nothing to the community. Only to the provider and its associates. Which again it’s none of my concern unless it’s causing real negative reason to others around me. I’m glad they put a law that makes marijuana a dui, makes it safer for the people around us although of course it’s still going to happen.

    Reply

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